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Low Magnesium?

Hi I have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and a friend suggested to me to take a magnesium supplement. So I bought a magnesium spray for me to apply to my skin.

I had my magnesium levels checked about a month before I used the spray and these are the results:

Serum magnesium: 0.89 mmol/L (0.70-1.00 mmol/L)

Yet when I used the magnesium spray I had some tingling in my arms soon after using it. The instructions on the bottle say if I experience tingling after applying the spray that meant my levels of magnesium are low! So I don't understand why my magnesium levels are supposedly normal and then I use a spray that tell me I could be deficient in it!

Anyone explain to me why this could be please?

Thanks! :)
37 Responses
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1530171 tn?1448129593
It has to do with tissue level deficiency, which is what you should be really concerned with.
99% of your magnesium is in the tissues, so don't bother with your serum levels.
BTW  you can buy magnesium chloride flakes and mix them with water
50/50 to make your own magnesium oil.
I've been doing this for years and it really works for me.
Try every other day, avoid sensitive parts of your body and after
You dry yourself, use a long natural bristle brush and give yourself a
Lymphatic massage. You will fell like a new ..person, lol!

Cheers!
Niko
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks for this! I thought I was going mad. :)

Trying the oil every other day will work out fine for me as I only have a shower every other day. I have a natural bristle brush too. It's meant for reflexology but it works just as well. :)
Helpful - 0
1756321 tn?1547095325
I had a severe magnesium deficiency symptoms but didn't wait to be tested. I was suffering with symptoms such as wide spread body pain, full body seizures, hallucinations and severe heart rhythm problems. I connected the dots once I put together my 50 + symptoms along with vitamin D resistance and hypoparathyroidism.

Some of my earliest symptoms of magnesium deficiency include sudden ringing in one ear that shows up randomly and lasts a short while, biting my nails again, craving chocolate, having to crack my hip, an itchy spot of my heel that is very difficult to relieve, hiccups.

But of interest different symptoms can show up after correcting magnesium and going low again! My magnesium levels dropped again and my knee started to click loudly with every step! O_o lol

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
50+ symptoms? Yikes!

Ringing in one ear, itchy spots on soles of feet (not heels) and hiccups, all things I'm prone to getting. And I crave sweets all the time - I've been craving salt lately, too.

Your knee clicking loudly sounds painful! :o I get clicking but in my hips. One of my hips was surgically corrected about 3 years ago (tendonitis) and didn't click for months but now they both do! I just put it down to hypermobility or twisting about too much.
Helpful - 0
1756321 tn?1547095325
Salt cravings is another possible symptom of magnesium deficiency. Magnesium is required to form the synovial fluid that surrounds the joints so that explains the joint issues.  The knee clicking wasn't painful but the  superfast muscle contractions on my knee was!
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Avatar universal
I've learnt something new about salt cravings being a symptom of magnesium deficiency. :) Would Hashimoto's cause salt cravings or is that less likely? Easy to blame everything on the Hashimoto's but just a thought...
Helpful - 0
1756321 tn?1547095325
I too have Hashimoto's thyroiditis. I like to blame everything on Hashi's as a joke with my mother. Leg fell off. Yep Hashimoto's. LOL  Hypothyroidism is a listed cause of salt cravings as well. There is an indepth article on symptoms (although that isn't a complete list but pretty extensive): "300+ Hypothyroidism Symptoms…Yes REALLY"
Helpful - 0
1530171 tn?1448129593
Do not overlook the possibility of adrenal fatigue .
Salt craving and  low blood pressure are very common symptoms.

The greatest challenge is to regulate thyroid function in Hashi's,
when adrenal fatigue sets the stage for reverse T3, down regulating thyroid function, for adrenal recovery.
So treating hashi's according to your current thyroid function, should you have adrenal fatigue, is going to backfire in the long run.
If you're experiencing many unexplained setbacks with your health,
consider the above scenario and get checked for adrenal fatigue (not through a conventional Endo if you have any respect for your sanity and health, lol!)
If you need details, let me know.

Cheers!
Niko
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi Niko, yes, I'm interested in getting details regarding getting checked for adrenal fatigue. Thanks. :)
Helpful - 0
1530171 tn?1448129593
Hi Sunny.

The following is a self-assessment/questionnaire for adrenal fatigue.
If you wish, you may send me your results on a pm and we'll take it from there.

Adrenal Questionnaire  

Read each question carefully, and record the number next to a question if it applies to you.
When you finish, add up the numbers you have recorded.


Do you experience fatigue? 3


Do you have allergies? 3


Do you have asthma? 3


Do you have recurrent infections? 3


Are you under severe emotional stress? 3


Do you suffer from chronic pain or physical stress? 3


Do you have low blood pressure? 2


Do you have a low pulse rate (<70/min with no exercise)? 2


Do you feel faint when you rise quickly? 2


Do you experience depressed moods? 2


Do you experience joint pain? 2


Do you have muscle pain? 2


Do you have low libido? 2


Do you have hair loss? 2


Do you have anxiety attacks? 2


TOTAL SCORE _______  

Less than 7 adrenal fatigue unlikely
7-12  adrenal fatigue possible
Over 12  likely.

Cheers,
Niko
Helpful - 0
1756321 tn?1547095325
Barely being able to function isn't on the list??? O_o Severe adrenal fatigue is called a nervous breakdown. I was a complete and utter mess. I couldn't handle any stress whatsoever. I was crying over everything and when you do that in public it's bad. Real bad.

My pupils fluctuated in the light so fast it was less than a second. I could draw the back of a spoon over my skin and it would turn bright white and spread over 2 inches. My two main causes of severe adrenal fatigue was due to severe vitamin B12 deficiency and again due to a very bad two month bout of being very hyperthyroid (hashitoxicosis). Untreated hypothyroidism also causes adrenal fatigue but not as severe.
Helpful - 0
1530171 tn?1448129593
By no means this assessment is a complete list of all its presentations, but I think it was designed to cover key areas of this condition, in order to make it work for screening purposes, before actual testing.
The level of general dysfunction is, more or less, according to the stage of adrenal fatigue  and the main causative factor remains stress,regardless of origin, emotional, biological, hidden or not...
  
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Avatar universal
Thanks for replying with this. Sorry, do I need to record a number from 1 to 3 to generate a total score?
Helpful - 0
1530171 tn?1448129593
The score for each yes answer is given.
Unfortunately I did not keep my notes at the time-, I saved this a few years ago- in order to get any kind of feedback from the originator in relation to the weighing of each answer.
So for anything that is present once in a "blue moon", I would say it's a no, which has naturally, a score of zero.
Something occurring on a frequent basis, it would be a yes, which means you put the corresponding score as it shows above next to the question.

I hope it helps.
Niko
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Ah, ok. I see. Thanks for explaining. :)

Here are my answers:

Do you experience fatigue? 3


Do you have allergies? 0


Do you have asthma? 0


Do you have recurrent infections? 3


Are you under severe emotional stress? 3


Do you suffer from chronic pain or physical stress? 3


Do you have low blood pressure? 0


Do you have a low pulse rate (<70/min with no exercise)? 2


Do you feel faint when you rise quickly? 2


Do you experience depressed moods? 2


Do you experience joint pain? 2


Do you have muscle pain? 2


Do you have low libido? 2


Do you have hair loss? 2


Do you have anxiety attacks? 2


TOTAL SCORE _28_
Helpful - 0
1530171 tn?1448129593
Yikes!   That is high, but it does not correlate with severity and prognosis.

For actual adrenal testing in UK, I did a fast search and Smart Nutrition,
has pertinent information, but, I'm suggesting it, only for information purposes,
as a reference , since I have no experience with them what-so-ever.

Please do your own research, before you decide for any adrenal testing , to ensure accuracy, reasonable price and professionalism, should you decide to go ahead with it.

To my opinion saliva testing is better, even if NHS may not cover this.
I'm not familiar with insurance codes  in the UK

Keep me posted.

Niko
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi there, thanks for recommending the Smart Nutrition when you searched. A few of the people at my local thyroid support group use one called Genova Diagnostics which post the results to me once I've paid for the test and sent off the samples.

I've changed doctors because I found that my current one wasn't keen on doing tests for copper and zinc, both of which I believe I'm deficient in but never been checked for them.

Off subject, but I can write this as a new thread if necessary, are bladder problems likely with  thyroid/autoimmune/adrenal issues? My urologist thinks communication between my bladder and brain are disrupted somewhere, so possibly neurological (just a thought) and I have no thirst instinct. They prescribed me an anticholinergic but this is for Parkinson's and the side effects concern me, mostly the ones mentioning dry mouth!
Helpful - 0
1530171 tn?1448129593
Look into Huperzine A, a herbal supplement with no known side effects, when taken as recommended.

Yes thyroid could be the main culprit, but again everything is interlinked.

What makes you suspect these deficiencies?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks for suggesting the Huperzine A. I'll see if Amazon stock this. :)

I saw a complementary therapist a few months ago and she asked me to do a zinc taste test. She put some zinc solution in tap water, mixed it and asked me to hold it in my mouth for 30 seconds to see if I could taste any zinc. I just tasted plain water and when I told her she said I was low in zinc. I wondered if it was possible to confirm with a blood test or if a zinc taste test is evidence enough then I'll forgo the blood test for zinc.

I spoke to some fellow thyroid patients on a forum - which manages the thyroid illnesses alternatively than with just the thyroxine - and they suggested I get my copper levels checked because they sent me a draft letter to write to my doctor, saying that many thyroid patients have copper deficiency and that it correlates with lipid levels and cardiovascular risk.
Helpful - 0
1756321 tn?1547095325
I've had insulin resistance for decades which is why I was low in magnesium and zinc for decades.  My symptoms of zinc deficiency included poor sense of taste and smell, poor appetite, very fussy eater, night blindness, white spots on nails.  I also healed very slowly but that was notably due to vitamin B12 malabsorption although low zinc wasn't helping matters.

Since correcting my zinc deficiency I can now eat cooked carrots that are burnt on the edges - fussy much? lol - but due to sensory memory I'm not sure how many other foods I'll be able to add to my list of likes. My result below was #3 and the taste was very mild like a powdery taste.

Some excerpts about zinc deficiency from the article "The Zinc Taste Test" by Ronald L. Myers, CNC.

"In 1984 information appeared in the Lancet (Aug 11, p. 350; Nov 17, p. 1162) regarding the use of the Zinc Taste Test (ZTT) in patients with anorexia and depression.  This test was developed and used because plasma and serum zinc levels were considered unreliable measures of zinc status."

"Patient should refrain from eating, drinking or smoking for at least a half-hour.  Have the patient place 1 to 2 tsp. of Aqueous Zinc in their mouth swirling it for 10 seconds and then swallow it or spit it out.  After 30 seconds the patient is asked to describe the taste and their response should be graded based on the following parameters:

1) Optimal zinc levels—An immediate, unpleasant, obviously adverse taste, at which the patient normally grimaces.

2) Adequate Zinc Levels—A definite but not strongly unpleasant taste is noted immediately and tends to intensify with time.

3) Quite Zinc Deficient—No taste noted initially, but develops in 10-15 seconds.

4) Very Zinc Deficient—Tasteless or “tastes like water”"

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1756321 tn?1547095325
Well I should of said in my case untreated hypothyroidism also causes adrenal fatigue but not as severe. Okay well not too bad for a screening test then. :)
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Avatar universal
Thanks for getting the extract from the zinc taste test. :) It arrived today but I wasn't in so I will try it once I've collected it. My alternative therapist asked me to try it and she said that most practitioners use it so I thought that maybe since I haven't felt that much better, a zinc taste test is worth doing and redoing once the levels have sorted themselves out. And if my doctor is unwilling to do the blood test for zinc.

I have moved doctor practices now and when I go to my first appointment with my new doctor (which might be soon as I believe the problems I've been having could be due to the levothyroxine) I will insist on needing a medical professional to work with me. The number of times I've doctor hopped is getting frustrating now and the practice I'm now with will be the last one I use for anything autoimmune related or thyroid related. There was one doctor at my first practice who was more accepting of alternative therapies, but she has now left. :( If they fail to work with me,  as they're the medical practitioners, then I'll be either going private (which I may not get any joy from), alternative therapies or self-treating. :)
Helpful - 0
1530171 tn?1448129593
The association of copper deficiency and hypothyroidism is mainly indirect.
There's little research on direct association.
Copper is necessary for iron metabolism & hemoglobin production, both of which are important for proper thyroid function.

As for zinc, personally I take zinc lonzenges, which improved my sense of taste-never bothered with testing,lol!
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Avatar universal
If the link between copper deficiency and hypothyroidism is mainly indirect then maybe getting tested for it is not needed at this moment in time. I've no idea if my iron is good but if my ferritin is low then maybe the total iron profile is a good thing to consider instead. Hemoglobin estimation is always good during complete blood counts. Last one is 137 (120-150) unless there is a different way of finding this out. :)

Are the zinc lozenges sublingual?
Helpful - 0
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