Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Acromegaly/post surgery

Hi, I had a pituitary macroadenoma that produced growth hormone and proclactin removed in 2004. surgery was considered successful with normal growth hormone,IGF1 and prolactin levels since. I have developed Hypothyroidism since surgery. I'm just wondering about others' post-surgery experiences.
3 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
That is pretty normal. TSH is usually not valid post any pituitary surgery (had cushing's and prolactinoma, two separate tumors).

I have since become panhypopit.

Growth hormone often becomes an issue, so I hope they are watching that with you as well. You should be monitored often for changes. I have a lot, so I get monitored every 4 months, but depending on how stable you are, you can go 6 months or so, but I would still see a doc regularly.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Wow. Does that happen a lot after pituitary surgery? Becoming panhypopit? How long after your surgeries did that become an issue. Thanks for the info.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
Oh sorry - becoming hypopit happens sometimes, becoming panhyopit is not the norm and mine was not really due to my surgery but having an aggressive tumor and having most of the other organs removed. I was pretty much diseased all over for most of my endocrine system. Lucky me. not.

It all happens differently but being monitored is key - as changes do happen. But I do know that TSH becomes invalid immediately - that the testing should be the T4 and T3 and preferably the frees as that will tell the doc what the thyroid is really doing, as TSH is really a pit test.
Helpful - 0
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Brain/Pituitary Tumors Community

Top Cancer Answerers
Avatar universal
Northern, NJ
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Here are 15 ways to help prevent lung cancer.
New cervical cancer screening guidelines change when and how women should be tested for the disease.
They got it all wrong: Why the PSA test is imperative for saving lives from prostate cancer
Everything you wanted to know about colonoscopy but were afraid to ask
A quick primer on the different ways breast cancer can be treated.
Get the facts about this disease that affects more than 240,000 men each year.