Aa
MedHelp.org will cease operations on May 31, 2024. It has been our pleasure to join you on your health journey for the past 30 years. For more info, click here.
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Brain Tumor- Blood tests

My mom was diagnosed with a benign brain tumor and started radiation.  She has not had any blood tests done before diagnosis or during the treatment.  Should she request any particular blood tests?  The doctors did not do a biopsy, they said it was benign based on the x-rays/scans.

3 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
Any tumor near the optic nerve (which could be a pituitary tumor) is inoperable since they cannot risk cutting the optic nerve. Often though they do surgery first to debulk as radiation takes months to years to take effect.

It may have been a large, non-functioning pituitary tumor? But still, they would have done testing in that case at a competent practice. If it is pituitary, and this is speculation as it could be pineal or otherwise, she should need replacement hormones.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
The brain tumor is near the optic nerve.  The information I am able to get from her is very limited.  
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
They can tell cancer in the scans from the shape of the lesions - basically smooth lesions are likely benign and ragged edges are likely not.

They should have given her a diagnosis of some sort in order to have given her radiation so they had to have determined the type of tumor - so it may be a glioma of some sort (I am purely guessing).

It may be that they did not biopsy due to risk due to location, which is why they also opted not to do surgery. You did not note size, location of the tumor.

Do you have a copy of the MRI or CT reports?
Helpful - 0

You are reading content posted in the Brain/Pituitary Tumors Community

Top Cancer Answerers
Avatar universal
Northern, NJ
Learn About Top Answerers
Popular Resources
Here are 15 ways to help prevent lung cancer.
New cervical cancer screening guidelines change when and how women should be tested for the disease.
They got it all wrong: Why the PSA test is imperative for saving lives from prostate cancer
Everything you wanted to know about colonoscopy but were afraid to ask
A quick primer on the different ways breast cancer can be treated.
Get the facts about this disease that affects more than 240,000 men each year.