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Avatar universal

Chills

It has been 3 weeks since my craniotomy.  I am on Dilantin.  I am constantly cold, even though it is 70-80 degrees outside and inside.  During my last nap, I was awakened by a full body chill while under a pile of blankets.  I do not have a fever.  Anybody else had this problem?
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Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
Have they checked your dilantin levels to make sure that you do not have an overdose?
Are you running a fever?

Have you called your doctor?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
They haven't checked yet...my next checkup is on the 26th...I assume they checked with my last bloodwork before I left the hospital on 03/31.  Temp was slightly elevated today at 99.8 but went down to normal this evening.  Called the doctor with several complaints and they always say "that's normal".
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
How is it normal? I would ask them that question... And ask for blood work.

They may not be paying attention as fever is only slight, but I have had infection with low fevers. Can you see a GP?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I ask and ask and ask...I told the doctor, his PAs, and everybody else in the hospital that it felt like I had an ear and sinus infection (I am the queen of sinus infections) and they just blew it off.  One PA said she wished she could look in my ear, but didn't have access to an otoscope.  In a hospital?????

I will be going to my GP this week and finally get my ear and sinuses looked at.

Thank you so much for listening and answering.  I wish my doctors would do the same.  You are the best.
Helpful - 0
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