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Avatar universal

Is this even a big deal?

I Was told I have a 2cm (20mm) tumor and am currently waiting for a call from a endocrinologist for further testing I guess... I'm living in somewhat silence about my diagnosis because I don't want to scare my loved ones so only a few close friends know and my employer (D.O.N). I don't know if it's cancerous or benign, and I try to stay away from Google haha. Even so, I believe the odds are good. I just hate waiting and feel it's unfair even though it includes the weekend it's been five days. I could get a little bit more information instead of no contact after such information. I guess my question is what can I do? Wait, it must not be bad if the Doctor isn't contacting me or concerned.

I got the MRI done because of lactation and I had lump in my left breast which is back and not to go all hypochondriac, but I had headaches and nausea for awhile but I didn't think anything of it and still not sure if I should bring this up. Also, have you ever laid your head so it hangs and then sit up and you get a rush throughout your head well this has happened but I will be sitting in place. I've had dizziness but again, I feel that I am a bother so I've resorted to this... Yuck, I hate feeling like this
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Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
I can tell you, even as a fellow patient, that it is 99.9% benign.

I can also tell you that as 2cm... it is sadly a big deal. However, if you only have elevated prolactin (and I would get a copy of the tests and find out of they tested other things because if they only tested prolactin, that is not enough), it can be treated, at least at first - depending on where it sits etc. with meds.

At least, they will try meds and see if it shrinks fast, and if not you will have to have surgery. Having had the surgery, I will tell you that it can be a pretty easy one (depends on surgeon - some do packing, some not, some are more experienced and some, well - in the end you want a super duper experienced person!!!)

I would also suggest that you don't need an endo - you need a pituitary center! A regular endo is pretty useless at this point. You have established that you have a macro-adenoma so find the nearest pituitary center and make an appointment ASAP.  Find a large hospital or university near you are ask.

The doctor is not concerned as they are not educated at all about them and they think size only. It can be treated and it can be done well - but it has to be done at a competent center. You have to get copies of everything. You need to know where the tumor sits to know if your eyesight is at right or it is growing down, or around veins and arteries. It is scary as poo in the beginning! Been there! But once you know, learn a bit, that scare recedes and you can participate intelligently in your care - and that is needed as not all the docs are... well, the best... so you need to know if this doc is A#1 or you need to move on.

Dizzy can happen if your tumor is wrapping or headaches to hormones that are going wonky... You need a pituitary center - get one and let us know how it goes.
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Avatar universal
Hi  My dad got diagnosed with a 4 cm macrodenoma benign tumor and we are in India.

Can you please inform some best pituitary centers. I tried searching all over internet but could not decide which one is better or not.

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Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
Find a larger hospital or university. Even in the U.S. This is how I find them here.
There is no way to get a rating, you have to go and be an educated patient. Then you can decide if this doctor is the best one to treat or not. Get copies of tests and all and get educated on the tumor.
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