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cording caused by interupted Lymph system?

Could the cording be caused of the lymphatic system "drying out"(not being used, drained)?
Would it be necessary to reconnect the Lymph system?
Is this at all possible?
By removing the Lymph nods for Biopsy dose this increase the chance of Cancer traveling further if the cancer recurs?
Is there a way to replace lymph nods?
Any suggestions for links
Thanks



This discussion is related to Fascial cording.
7 Responses
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Avatar universal
Hi.

I'm not sure what you mean by cording but I'm assuming that this may be a radiographic description (like from a mammogram, xray or ultrasound).  Appearances that can be similar to this cording phenomenon are commonly seen in post-operative or post-surgical sites, whether in the breast or other areas of the body.

The lymph channels are microscopic and some are composed of single cells acting as a wall.  For this reason, the lymph vessels cannot be reconstructed surgically.  Lymph nodes removed would not increase the chance of cancer travelling, nor can they be replaced after being taken out.

Regards.
Helpful - 0
492898 tn?1222243598
I think you are talking about those cords which can occur if one or more lymph nodes were removed. These are scar tissue, or more specifically, fibroid lymphatic vessels.  i have been asking a lot of questions and this is the best answer I have received. curiously, it appears that this never used to be a problem in the past much but is a fairly new development.  The worst case my PT has ever seen was in a woman who only had one lymph node removed. I have it as well and these come and go. i had about 18 lymph nodes removed.  I wonder if this new development has anything to do with the fairly new practice of doing sentinel node biopsies. This is only a question on my part and would be a good research question. most doctors are not yet very familiar with this and what or why it is caused. We have a discussion going about 'violin strings', so if you are interested, look for this post by me.  I referred to those cords descriptively as strings on a violin, as they can be very thin and very tight and very long.
Helpful - 0
492898 tn?1222243598
I think you are talking about those cords which can occur if one or more lymph nodes were removed. These are scar tissue, or more specifically, fibroid lymphatic vessels.  i have been asking a lot of questions and this is the best answer I have received. curiously, it appears that this never used to be a problem in the past much but is a fairly new development.  The worst case my PT has ever seen was in a woman who only had one lymph node removed. I have it as well and these come and go. i had about 18 lymph nodes removed.  I wonder if this new development has anything to do with the fairly new practice of doing sentinel node biopsies. This is only a question on my part and would be a good research question. most doctors are not yet very familiar with this and what or why it is caused. We have a discussion going about 'violin strings', so if you are interested, look for this post by me.  I referred to those cords descriptively as strings on a violin, as they can be very thin and very tight and very long.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks for the response
Your response regarding the Lymph walls and nods was helpfull.
I can see how imposible it could be to connect a one cell tube...
and same would then be for replacing the nodes.

Regarding the cording, my girl friend had her sentinel node removed during a lumpectomy to make shure no cancer had traveled throu the lymph system.
about two weeks after she started to notice a string like (rope) from the breast to the arm forming. (quite painfull)
After more reading it seems that this is related to scaring of the Lymphatic Vessels..
It seems the solution is masaging the rope (during wich it can "snap" and can cause an instant relif for the Paitient) and Physio movement to strech the rope/cording
Thanks again
Helpful - 0
25201 tn?1255580836
Your are absolutely correct about the massage for cording. I experienced this condition and when I questioned my Surgeon he had no idea what I was talking about. It will improve with the treatment you mentioned and shouldn't be idnored. It may take some time but trust me, it will get better. Rather painful though. Most Dr.s don't know much about it; just like some deny that Lymphedema occurs as often as it does. Rregards to you both .....
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks for the responce.
Any suggestions how to make the Massage more apealing?
Massage oil?

Here is an article that goes with the Massage theorie.

Physical Therapy Treatment of Axillary Web Syndrome, by Kepics, Jane M
Try this link:
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3946/is_200401/ai_n9370189?tag=artBody;col1
Good luck to all

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
A related discussion, cording/violin strings was started.
Helpful - 0
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