Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Is it possible that a hard immovable lump that has been there 4 years is cancer?

Hi there, about 4 years ago i went to the doctors concerning my lymph node on the bone behind my right ear  was swollen and i was worried about it so i brought this up to my doctor and he said not to worry about it and he took a blood test and everything came back clear. What i didnt mention to him at the time was the hard round shaped lump next to the lymph node in the indent in your skull between your ear and the back of your skull because at the time i thought maybe it was meant to be there but as i feel it now i know its not meant to be there as there isnt anything identical on the other side and also it doesnt feel like bone it feels like a hard lump that just shouldnt be there. It has caused me no problems over the years and hasnt grown it is still about 1.5cm big. I am wondering if this could be a cancerous tumour as it has been there 4 years which makes me think it could be a benign tumour but i just recently read somewhere that you can have a slow growing cancer for up to 30 years which makes me worry it is a cancerous lump as it is hard, immovable and not tender to touch. I have just recenty started worrying about this again and before anybody says it is not a lymph node i know what they feel like and also it is right beside my lymph node behind my ear so it isnt. This lump is obviously the reason my lymph node in that region has also been swollen for 4 years. Any response on whether you think this lump could be cancerous or benign would be greatly appreciated
1 Responses
Avatar universal
Since it hasnt grown in size at all in 4 years should i be less worried? Or could it still be a slow growing cancer??
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Cancer Community

Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Here are 15 ways to help prevent lung cancer.
New cervical cancer screening guidelines change when and how women should be tested for the disease.
They got it all wrong: Why the PSA test is imperative for saving lives from prostate cancer
Everything you wanted to know about colonoscopy but were afraid to ask
A quick primer on the different ways breast cancer can be treated.
Get the facts about this disease that affects more than 240,000 men each year.