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Congestive Heart Disease Questions

1. What are the symptoms?
2. Is it hereditary?
3. Is it completely preventable?
4. When do most people find out they have it?
5. How do most people find out they have it?
6. What other illnesses can help the disease?
7. If you can, how do you get rid of it?
8. Is it potentially deadly?
9. What are some activities you can't do when you have this disease?
10. Can you get surgery to get rid of it? If so, what would the recovery be like?
3 Responses
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Avatar universal
My aunty has problem of acidity.Previously doctor said that she had heart problem but all reports got normaly like ecg or angiography.Then doc said that pain was because of acidity.Many medicines she has taken but still she had littlebit problem with that.Can anybody tell me what is cure for this?
Helpful - 0
159619 tn?1538180937
COMMUNITY LEADER
The major symptom of CHF is fatigue, poor exercise tolerance and shortness of breath with normal activity. If you are experiencing any of these you need to get checked out.

Remember, CHF is usually the result of anther underlying condition like prolonged high blood pressure, a common virus that settles in the heart muscle, valve disease, heart attack and many more.

As far as a treatment goes, the underlying cause is treated first. In some cases the heart can recover, in many it can not and there is no cure short of the ultimate treatment of a transplant. If you are concerned, you need to ask these questions of your doctor.

Good luck!

Jon
Helpful - 0
63984 tn?1385437939
Jon answered a lot of your questions, here's a followup:
1.  The symptoms vary, I think.  In my case I noticed increased problems getting my breath when I exercised and chest discomfort, and fatigue.
2.  I don't know if it is hereditary.  My grandfathers both died from heart attacks, but my father died of cancer in his late 80's and my mother died of who knows what at the age of 95.  Genetics, however, obviously are an influence.
3.  Certainly it would be wise to avoid obvious behaviors that affect the heart such as inactivity, smoking, anxiety, diabetes/obesity.  That said, genetics can play a big role.
4.  Age is not a factor, the causes are the problem.  A Baby can have it as well as someone very old.
5.  I'd say most people know they have it when they have tests that show poor cardiac function.
6.  Diabetes, Rheumatic Fever, Congential issues, to name a few.
7.  Surgery to open heart arteries, repair of heart valves, losing weight, exercise, taking the drugs prescribed are just a few answers, depending on the cause.
8.  Yes.
9.  Most people with CHF have difficulty doing aerobic exercise, lifting heavy weights, climbing stairs.  That said, those exercises can help one raise what is called the Ejection Fraction, or basically the level of efficiency of one's heart.
10.  This is too complex a question to answer.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Congestive Heart Failure, it is time to listen to the health professional.  There are a lot of people on this board who have lived a long time with the disease and are still standing and thriving and can offer encouragement, but only your doctor can plan the route to recovery.  We can encourage you.
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