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My aunty is Covid+. I need help regarding medications and precautions

My aunty is 65 years old. She has high blood pressure(~140). Her symptoms started with severe headache and body weakness. Next day, Headache was gone but she got fever (~38 degree C) and severe weakness. She started taking Paracetamol and azithromycin. After 4-5 days, she started having cough also. Fever and weakness was as it is. Oxymeter reading is fluctuating between 94-96. She is taking steam inhalation and drinking hot water also along with multivitamins, Zincovit and Vit-C tablets and home remedies like drinking luke warm lemon water or turmeric milk. She is in home isolation but still after 14 days  there is not not much improvement so she went for Covid RT-PCR, CT-Scan and blood test. After 14 days of initial symptoms, her CT-scan score is 5/25, RT-PCT score is 22, CRP protein 2.83 mg/L, platelets 220 thousands/uL, oxymeter Spo2 95-96. She took azithromycin for 10 days now she is taking only paracetamol. But there is not much improvement in SPO2. Fever and weakness is still same. Is there any complications. Is she recovering or not. What medications or precautions should be taken.
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207091 tn?1337709493
She needs to follow up with her doctor. With her high blood pressure, and any other conditions she may have, she needs to work with her doctor. We can't offer medical advice to someone in this kind of condition.

If she still has a fever, and her CRP is elevated, and she is so weak, it doesn't seem like she is recovering.

Azithromycin is an antibiotic and won't do anything for this, unless she had another infection. Covid is a virus.

Please call her doctor today, or get her to a hospital. I hope she recovers quickly.
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Avatar universal
Look, she is using things that are part of conspiracy theories.  I hate to say that, because I'm sure you are all doing the best you can.  From your name, I'm guessing you're in India, which is a mess right now.  I don't know if you are in India, but it may be there really is no medical care available where you are.  I know they are short of oxygen there.  But the things she is taking are things that were touted as help at the beginning of the pandemic by quacks, including many political leaders including in the US, but they don't work.  The antibiotic was being touted a year ago, but that was never true.  The pain killer might make her feel better but has no ability to treat the virus.   Vitamin C and Vitamin D can be helpful in keeping someone from getting sick in the first place but it's too late for that.  Zinc might have minor benefits, but only that.  Turmeric is wonderful for inflammation and the liver but not for covid. There is what is pretty much a cure for covid, but only if you take it very early in the process, but it still might help, but again, India probably doesn't have access to it, and that is a couple of drugs called monoclonal antibodies.  You have to get them by sitting for an hour in a place that has them and can inject them for that long.  If one gets them early enough, they have shown to be over 80% effective at preventing death, but even where they are available they have not been widely used but if your hospital has any of them that is an option to ask about.  Are you in India, and are you in a place that is so overwhelmed you can't get proper medical help?
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I forgot to mention, there is also a steroid that is used that helps with inflammation.  It is generic and cheap (and very possibly made in India).  But to get these treatments you do have to see a doctor.
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