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Biopsied mole not healing

I had a small mole biopsied about 10 days at the dermatologist. The doctor said it wasn't super worrisome but decided to biopsy it anyway given my family's history of skin cancer (grandfather died of melanoma) and the mole's location on my back where I couldn't keep a close eye on it. This was the first mole I'd ever had biopsied so I didn't really know what to expect and thought everything would be fine as soon as I got the call from the doctor saying everything was fine. However, the sore leftover will not stop hurting! First of all, it's pretty large; about 3 times the size of the mole itself and its like a huge crater in my back. That wouldn't worry me that much if it weren't for the pain. The mole was at the small of my back (kind of the "tramp stamp area") so I was already worried about it being so close to my spinal cord. Obviously, the biopsied area itself hurts (I've had several spinal taps when I went through leukemia chemotherapy, and it feels similar to the pain I'd get after one) but what's worrisome is that the pain radiates all the way up my back. It's a weird pain too, almost like a nerve was hurt or something. Finally, today I started noticing a weird similar pain directly opposite, on my stomach, almost like it was reaching there too. I've been keeping the wound clean and used antibiotic ointment, so I don't think it's infected. Any ideas what might be wrong? Am I just overreacting or should I try to contact my doctor?
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