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Concerned father - Baby Birthmark

My 6 week old newborn girl has a very slightly raised (raised to the touch) deep red mark on her shoulder/upper arm. Its about 6-8mm in diameter, and has gotten larger since birth. (in comparison to her growth rate).
It is red normally, but gets very red when she is in the tub or under strong light. (I.E. the flash on my camera)

Children can be severely cruel and I could foresee an issue where teasing from other children takes place and/or a future self confidence issue for a young woman who wants to expose her upper arm in a dress but has a "bull's eye" on her shoulder that is embarrassing.

A few questions:

1: What am I dealing with?

2: Can this be corrected with a medical procedure?

3: If it can be corrected and scarring is a possibility, would it be better done earlier than later, so the scarring can fade over time? When would be the earliest I could possibly address this without being irresponsible?

4: Finally, if this would be considering a cosmetic treatment, should I start saving? I.E. is this expensive? I have IBX Personal Choice full medical coverage.

I attached a photo to show the area affected. The flash on the camera really brings the red out but the spot is quite obvious in normal light. Help/advice is graciously appreciated. I will be bringing this up at the next pediatrician appointment but I'm anxious for an understanding of what I'm dealing with prior to the visit.
2 Responses
Avatar universal
Most Infantile Hemangiomas regress in an year or two.Your pediatrician may recommend propranlol, in non-involuting hemangioma.

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1083849-overview
Avatar universal
Thank you for the link and taking the time to respond. :)
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