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2186126 tn?1384957426

Endings for Untreated Cushings in Dogs

My 14.5 yr old beagle was diagnosed with Cushing's Disease a few months ago. He is nearly blind and deaf already - we decided not to put him through the treatment. My question is how do most older dogs with untreated Cushing's begin to fail? I would really like to minimize any suffering in his final days. Right now, I am red-flagging every little twitch and thinking if I knew what to expect, I could calm down a little and hopefully not send any frightened messages to Spartacus. He is currently on Proin to control his urine accidents and that has worked for a few months now. Would just really prefer to look at him with joy rather than fear these days. Thanks, in advance, for your knowledge & stories.
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Avatar universal
Try looking at products with Petwellbeing.  I treated my dog with their product for cushings.  I have posted already if you wish to read.  Bless our pets!!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
    My 15 yr old dachshund passed last month from pituitary dependent cushings related issues. She had been struggling with seizures for a year and a half before she suddenly developed a tooth root abscess and was unable to heal from. Sadly, it forced me to put her to sleep w/ in a week. Her teeth didn't seem so bad, though I wanted to have them cleaned last year to be on top of her oral care. However, because of her seizures, my vet didn't want to put her through dental surgery/ anesthesia; this was a mistake. She should have referred me to an animal hospital where they can resuscitate.
   When she was diagnosed, I began cooking all of her meals organic, veggies and high quality protein (recipes online), and adding supplements (omega 3, calcium, children's multi) which worked wonders. My single biggest regret is that I didn't brush her teeth every day and add probiotics to her meals every time. Dogs with cushings are highly susceptible to bacterial infections, so feeding probiotics helps the entire system, including the mouth hygiene. So GIVE PROBIOTICS WITH EVERY MEAL. I also recommend blood test at least every four months on schedule, as you never know when the symptoms will cause a cascading effect on the bodily functions. My dog ended up turning a sharp corner in the end that I feel could have been softened if I had been only slightly more rigorous with these key elements.
   I had decided last year with my vet to just manage her symptoms, ie seizures, with anticonvulsants and diet because she was nearly 14 when she was diagnosed, and the treatments are harsh on the body, so we decided to take it easy on her with the meds. If I had to do it again, I would treat it more aggressively and hope for the best. The medication that seems to have the best reviews over all is called Vetoryl. I now think by shrinking the tumor with this medicine, then managing the subsequent side effects of treatment is the superior approach for dogs under 14. Make sure to google/ research the heck out of Cushing as it is very complex, and you'll want to make sure your vet can refer you to a specialist as symptoms become more serious. Get second and third opinions, etc. Drs don't truly understand this illness very well at all, and tend to have varying opinions on treatments, etc.
     This condition has the potential to be heart breaking, so try to do everything you can asap. It seems like an expensive and difficult process, but just break it down and figure it out, it cannot be ignored or you will regret it. There is nothing like the guilt of losing a pet and feeling like maybe there was something more you could have done to keep them safe. And remember, even if you have a team of highly reputable Drs In your corner, you know your dog better. If you think there's something wrong, there is, do not delay finding the source of the problem.
Take care,
Emily
PS. Use raw coconut oil on dry noses;)
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
    My 15 yr old dachshund passed last month from pituitary dependent cushings related issues. She had been struggling with seizures for a year and a half before she suddenly developed a tooth root abscess and was unable to heal from. Sadly, it forced me to put her to sleep w/ in a week. Her teeth didn't seem so bad, though I wanted to have them cleaned last year to be on top of her oral care. However, because of her seizures, my vet didn't want to put her through dental surgery/ anesthesia; this was a mistake. She should have referred me to an animal hospital where they can resuscitate.
   When she was diagnosed, I began cooking all of her meals organic, veggies and high quality protein (recipes online), and adding supplements (omega 3, calcium, children's multi) which worked wonders. My single biggest regret is that I didn't brush her teeth every day and add probiotics to her meals every time. Dogs with cushings are highly susceptible to bacterial infections, so feeding probiotics helps the entire system, including the mouth hygiene. So GIVE PROBIOTICS WITH EVERY MEAL. I also recommend blood test at least every four months on schedule, as you never know when the symptoms will cause a cascading effect on the bodily functions. My dog ended up turning a sharp corner in the end that I feel could have been softened if I had been only slightly more rigorous with these key elements.
   I had decided last year with my vet to just manage her symptoms, ie seizures, with anticonvulsants and diet because she was nearly 14 when she was diagnosed, and the treatments are harsh on the body, so we decided to take it easy on her with the meds. If I had to do it again, I would treat it more aggressively and hope for the best. The medication that seems to have the best reviews over all is called Vetoryl. I now think by shrinking the tumor with this medicine, then managing the subsequent side effects of treatment is the superior approach for dogs under 14. Make sure to google/ research the heck out of Cushing as it is very complex, and you'll want to make sure your vet can refer you to a specialist as symptoms become more serious. Get second and third opinions, etc. Drs don't truly understand this illness very well at all, and tend to have varying opinions on treatments, etc.
     This condition has the potential to be heart breaking, so try to do everything you can asap. It seems like an expensive and difficult process, but just break it down and figure it out, it cannot be ignored or you will regret it. There is nothing like the guilt of losing a pet and feeling like maybe there was something more you could have done to keep them safe. And remember, even if you have a team of highly reputable Drs In your corner, you know your dog better. If you think there's something wrong, there is, do not delay finding the source of the problem.
Take care,
Emily
PS. Use raw coconut oil on dry noses;)
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
My little Blue is a 12 year old Toy Manchester Terrier and has struggled for years with various illnesses from idiopathic vestibular disease to regular ear and bladder infections. Last year he was finally diagnosed with Cushing's. I tried the chemo and everything else under the sun until finally I decided to stop treatments and make him as comfortable as possible. The typical symptoms such as gorging on food and water and the frequent urination were part of our daily lives until recently, new ones started coming up. Weakness in the hind legs, weight loss and constant whimpering. Through all of this, he's still alert, hungry, energetic and playful as ever which confuses and frightens me. I will carry him outside 50 times a day to go potty if I have to but when do I draw the line? When do I make that decision to end his suffering? Are there more serious symptoms I should look for?
Helpful - 0
2186126 tn?1384957426
Sounds like a good decision for your pet - its all so difficult. Best...
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
What does your vet say about how your dog is?  Does he give advice?  Its a decision only you can make, I know when my dog had Cushings, treatments were unsuccessful and she had absolutely no quality of life.  She would just lay there all day, not playing, eating, anything.  Its so hard to make that decision, I feel for you.
Helpful - 0
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