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French bulldog died suddenly within 12 hours?

Our french bulldog Belle was sleeping in our bed on the night of friday the 14th June at 1:30am she seemed to have developed a thirst and at first we thought nothing of it, so we went back to sleep assuming she would pop her head back down beside us as she usually does when she sleeps in our bed. We brought Belle down and gave her some water and tucked her in to bed, and a usual kiss on the forehead. The next morning saturday the 15th june we woke up at approx 7:25am to find belle lying down in bed and not jumping up like she usually does when we come downstairs. As we went to pick Belle up to bring her up to bed for snuggles, both back and front legs had minimal movement. We called the vet. Being an early morning on a weekend vets did not open until 9am, so we had to bring her to the emergency respone veterinary hospital. She was taken in immediately for tests and blood work, as we left the vet both of us gave her one last kiss and hug (not knowing that this moment was the last time we would ever see Belle looking at us again) before we drove home eagerly waiting for an update.  At 12:30 midday we called with hoping for a positive update as to how Belle was doing, fortunately her condition had not got any worse and so we thought her condition would improve at this point. At 2:30pm, the vets had called us explaing Belle had been starting to struggle with oxygen and so she was put on an oxygen tank to keep her alive. Her bloods had come back fine and no toxins in her blood, so we knew at this point that Belle needed an MRI to see what was going on, however in Ireland there are very few places that have such equipment and do not open on weekends, which is crazy! So our only option for our baby was to keep her on oxygen support and let the vets continue tests. At 5:33 pm we got a call from the vets hoping to hear a positive update of any sort.. Belle had just taken her last breath and was having CPR done with adrenaline shots to bring her back to life. Holding our tears back on the phone we jumped in the car and arrived at the vet for 5:50pm. At this point we were waiting in a room while Belle has already been under CPR for 30mins. The vet came in and told us it wasn’t looking good and Belle might not pull through. 4 vets were working on her at this point. After 1 hour and 15 minutes of CPR and 3 adrenaline shots, she displayed no movement. All i can think that may have happened the day before was she ate an apple core on the ground during her walk around the park and got sick straight after, but as i went to kick it away.. she ate it again but it never came back out. Did it get stuck in her stomach? What caused the sudden loss of movement in her legs overnight( the 6 hours we left her). What caused her breathing to fail over the 10 hours being in the vet?
2 Responses
973741 tn?1342342773
Wow, how horrible.  I feel for you sweetie.  Our pets are our family and that was dramatic and sudden.  You are in shock, I'm sure. I'm so sorry for your loss.  I've read mixed things about apple cores. I think it takes a lot of apple cores to cause a true issue (from the arsenic in the seeds).  I don't know what exactly happened to Belle.  Did the vets have any ideas for you?  I know they don't do autopsies on our pups but it sure would be nice in situations like this.  

I have no advice for you on how to feel better any time soon.  I know it hurts so bad.  I lost our dog tragically a few years ago too. She suffocated with her head in a beef jerky bag while I was putting my kids to bed for the night upstairs.  It was truly horrible to find her being just a couple minutes too late.  Lots of "what if's" and feelings like what could I have done differently.  But in the end, it was the way it happened and nothing I could change after the fact.  I got our family a new dog (a puppy) two weeks later.  My sister is different.  She took almost 2 years to get another dog after losing hers.  Everyone is different.  I put a band aid on it and the puppy was a wonderful distraction from being sad and missing our dog.  And the puppy is now 5 years old and I adore her too.  We have infinite capacity to love.  

I am truly sorry for your loss.  hugs
675347 tn?1365460645
COMMUNITY LEADER
I too am very sorry to hear about the loss of your dog.

I don't kow (obviously) what caused her rapid death like this -from being well 24 hours before.
I doubt it would have been an apple core. It's true that apple seeds are toxic, and are for dogs too, but it takes quite a lot of seeds to cause a problem, even in a small dog. And they would usually pass through entire anyway as they are indigestible.
Toxins would only be released if they were crunched up, and it's unlikely a dog would eat apple seeds that way.
If little bits of the core got stuck, I think you would have seen different symptoms.
But from what you describe it seems her symptoms could have been neurological (inability to move the legs etc)
I wonder if there was a blood clot, or possibly stroke?

I had  Jack Russell once -before I ever knew apple seeds were toxic. He used to regularly eat apple cores my husband gave him, and he never had any problem from them.
Of course -now we know about that so it is best to cut out the core when giving dogs apple (which is very good for them in fact.)

Anyway, I send you my kindest thoughts and condolences on your loss.
Run free in Spirit, little dog.
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