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Meniere after long years

Hi, I'm Portuguese and I'm 56 years old. Sorry for my bad english  . I suffer from Meniere since I was 13 years old. I have   the disease present in both ears . In the right ear since the 9/10 years old I have profound deafness. In the left ear now i have a serious deafness and use auditory prosthetic since 1991. I have suffered over the years some episodes of vertigo. All quite intense that lasted from 24 pm until 15 days continuous. I also had a few years without any symptoms. Between 2000 and 2004 were difficult years in terms of Meniere's attacks. Although my balance is  affected, I had some years without crises or few episodes of vertigo. In 2011 I made a cochlear implant  in right ear. After that I had some problems with vertigo again. Start now to have daily a permanent state of dizziness, head feels heavy, I feel some nausea and I feel very tired. It was forwarded to me now, that I have bi-lateral vestibular hypofunction with preponderance on the right. I have done vestibular rehabilitation.  Start now to have daily a permanent state of dizziness, head feels heavy, I feel some nausea and I feel very tired. It was forwarded to me now that I have bi-lateral vestibular hypofunction with preponderance on the right. I have done vestibular rehabilitation. Although all these years has struggled to keep myself professionally active, I had periods in which there was not able to do. I still professionally active but beginning to have more difficulty  in concentrating   and do different tasks. I'm afraid of what these symptoms mean (in the meniere) and how hard it can be. Can you help me? Can you clarify me?
I enjoyed meeting people with experiences similar to mine and that wanted to say me how is your day-to-day. I'll do the same.  
Thanks for all . Lisa
2 Responses
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hello and hope you are doing well.

Lisa, Understand your predicament. Looks like there is a recurrence of your symptoms, for this surgical revisions of endolymphatic sac enhancement procedures have been tried. In addition to avoiding destructive procedures, revision of endolymphatic sac enhancement has restored health to many patients. So, discuss this with your doctor.

You can enroll yourself in a support group. You may find encouragement and understanding in a support group. Group members can provide information, resources, support and coping strategies. Your doctor may be able to recommend a group in your area, or you may find information about local groups from the Vestibular Disorders Association.

Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
Avatar universal
Hello!
Thank you for the message. I'll do that you recomended.

Best regards,
Lisa
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