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Avatar universal

What can cause pelvic area pain when running?

It all started back in September (9 months now) after several football (soccer) games. Every time I run or excert energy, I stumble onto pain on 3 specific locations, the coyccx, pelvic floor muscles (perineum), and the groin area (both right and left). I cannot continue to run/exercise afterwards. I rest a few days then the pain goes, and its been 9 months and I still get pain every time I sprint, especially if I play football where the sport needs quick mobility and going from right to left.

What I did-

Image testing (both Xray and MRI) - where both show that I have nothing out of the norm.
Physical therapy (4 different therapist, where each had his own technique, where some worked on stretching and some worked on strengthening)
Chiropractor (2 persons, but both did not help much)
3 Orthopedists (where each just said it is an inflammation, and gave out meds, they helped but it was only temporary, as soon as the effect is gone, I will feel pain again.)
Tons of blood test, urine testing, prostate test, inflammation - all within the range.

I have IBS, do not know if that has anything to do with, but I had it long since this issue. Moreover, when having intercourse, I have noticed that my ejaculation is weaker than before and I get pain in the balls afterwards (like the nerve having an electric shock or so), again do not know if that's relevant.

I am a 24 years old Male, normal weighted, daily active in the gym and playing football (before this issue).

I would greatly appreciate it if someone could guide me through this, I have tried everything, do not know what to do next to diagnose this issue.

2 Responses
Avatar universal
Nobody here is anywhere near as qualified as the folks you've already seen, so this is a real pickle.  I'm a big believer in, if you've done something recently and a problem immediately followed it, it's probably the cause.  In this case, the soccer games.  I'm not surprised orthopedists didn't notice anything.  Good ones are usually pretty conservative, so even if the diagnostic testing showed something they would have sent you to PT unless what it showed was something really bad.  I'm wondering if any of your physical therapists mentioned a theory based on their experience treating people of what they thought it was?  I've had them tell me the diagnosis from the orthopedist sounded wrong a couple of times based on what they were sensing.  Were they right?  Who knows?  I'm guessing you tweaked something that doesn't show up on imaging tests.  What it might be, for example, is periformis problems, which would usually result in sciatica in a bad case (I've had it twice) and can't be diagnosed by any imaging test as the muscle is too small and hidden to be seen clearly enough.  Because the pain from it is pinching on the sciatic nerve, the pain travels.  That's also possible with lower back tweaks, which can pinch on nerves as well.  I've currently got hip problems, and the pain spreads into the groin, thigh, buttocks -- a real pain.  So when you tweak something even if it isn't something that can be seen, it can be inflamed enough to pinch on nerves and send pain all over the area.  The treatment is rest for most people, and you don't sound like you rested for any lengthy period of time, plus when it's first injured, ice and anti-inflammatories if your stomach can handle them.  But you have to take a lot -- something I found out too late -- it's 3 0r 4 ibuprofen 3 times a day, for example, which for some can just tear the stomach apart.  But it takes that much for it to actually be strong enough to deal with inflammation.  Wish I could be of more specific help, but your description does sound like nerve pain, including the pain in sex, though it could also be a disease state but you've been examined for that and found to be okay, so we have to assume your docs were right.  And nerve pain would usually come from inflamed muscle or other tissue getting large enough to pinch the nerves.    
20620809 tn?1504366569
Pelvic pain when running is something others report as well.  Here's an article on it https://runnerclick.com/pelvic-pain/

I'm wondering about your hip rotator.  Is it weak?  Would physical therapy help with this to teach you some ways to improve that?  I see you have seen 4 though.  Nsaids help?  What about taking it before your game?  Call me crazy on this idea but a doctor recommended to me to eat a banana for joint pain associated with my running.  Bananas naturally fight inflammation.  Not that this will solve your issue, but good to work into things.  You are way to young to give up things you love like playing soccer.  You don't want permanent injuries, of course.  So, getting you back out there comfortably is ideal.

Have you had an MRI, by the way?

That article mentions one thing you haven't tried as of yet?  Massage. I have had great success with this for various issues related to distance running.  

1 Comments
I don't think bananas fight inflammation -- they are one of the highest fruits for sugar content.  What they are very high in, however, is potassium, a necessary electrolyte that helps to relax muscles, as does magnesium.  This is why they are so popular with athletes and why your doc probably recommended it.  But they are probably pro-inflammatory because of the high sugar content, though if you eat these high sugar fruits in moderation the high antioxidant content far outweighs the sugar problem assuming you're not overdoing it and not overdoing other sources of sugar.  Peace.
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