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Avatar universal

Developing symptoms 9 days after exposure

Hello,

On the 7th of this month, I had an encounter with a CSW.

It was very brief and fully protected with a condom. I am pretty confident that it did not break.

Now, it is the 9th day after the exposure and have developed a fever, a sore chest, coughing, slightly running nose, and general fatigue around my body. My tongue is fine and do not have any lymph nodes. Do I have ARS? Even with a fully protected encountered, is it still possible to contract HIV?

Thank you for your time. I am just incredibly worried.
7 Responses
300980 tn?1194929400
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Welcome to the Forum. I'll be pleased to comment.  Following a protected sexual encounter of the sort you describe your risk for HIV is virtually zero.  Certainly some of the symptoms you describe are part of the symptoms that we see among persons who have the ARS, a clinical syndrome which occurs in some persons who have recently acquired HIV however when such symptoms have been studied in at risk persons, less than 1% have HIV and the remainder have a variety of other problems causing their illness, most often viral illnesses acquired through other, non-sexual activities such as influenza.  Further, the onset of your symptoms is a bit on the early side to be due to HIV.

I would not worry that your current illness is HIV following protected sex.  It is far more likely to be a coincidence.  If you wish to prove that your symptoms are not due to HIV, a combined HIV p24 antigen/HIV antibody (DUO) test would be positive at this time if your current symptoms were due to HIV.

I hope these comments are helpful.  I urge you not to worry ab out HIV. Condom protected sex is safe sex as long as condoms are worn throughout the encounter and do not break (and when condoms break, they break wide open leaving no doubt that they have failed). EWH
Avatar universal
Thank you for your response.

I suppose the reason I am worried is the fact that the symptoms are very similar to ARS. The fever has subsided but still have a lot of muscle sores and coughing.

Though this article says that such symptoms can occur "days to weeks after exposure."

http://www.aafp.org/afp/1999/0801/p535.html#afp19990801p535-b3

But you mentioned that my symptoms are too early to be ARS. But the above article, as well as a few others are saying that it is 7-14 days that symptoms can emerge.

I suppose at this point I should just get tested to ease my mind. I appreciate your confidence. When should I get tested? Within the next month?
300980 tn?1194929400
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Each of these questions has already been answered.  As I said, there is much overlap between common flu-like viral illnesses and common, non-STI viral illnesses.  The ARS rarely starts less than 14 days after exposure although it occasionally can start sooner.  Testing with a DUO test at this time will prove that your current symptoms are not due to HIV.  

My further, final advice to you is to stay of the interent. it is all too often misleading. EWH
Avatar universal
Sorry, but one last question:

As you said, when condoms break they break wide open.

Is it possible for a condom to suffer from small tears?

Nothing leaked out after I ejaculated, so I guess that is an indicator?  
300980 tn?1194929400
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
If small leaks were a concern, I would have said so.  Your ejaculate stayed in the condom- it worked.  EWH
Avatar universal
Briefly, I wanted to mention that my symptoms are subsiding quite quickly. I am only suffering from congestion, coughing up phlegm, and a bit drowsy.

Is that a good indication of anything? I read that the symptoms of ARS can linger as long as a month.
300980 tn?1194929400
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Why would you expect for me to comment additionally on this statement.  I have already told you that that there was no risk from the exposure you described and that your symptoms are due to something other than the ARS.  EWH

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