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skin laceration

I was using the rest room at a local pub and after finishing when i came out, i saw a small cut on my skin that usually is done by a sharp object or surface. It was bleeding slightly. Now i dont know what object  caused the cut but was worried if there is any chance of infection assuming  the sharp object  was already contaminated with body fluid like blood. Regards and thank you for the response.
2 Responses
1318465 tn?1614894302
Hi

If we assume the sharp object (say a piece of glass from broken beer bottles at this pub),  was contained with body fluid like blood and this blood was once HIV infected, then you chances of getting infected is zero.

So there is no chance of getting infection from HIV in this way.
4 Comments
Thank You Jessy. May I indulge in one final follow up, does the assessment of zero infection would still hold water if the blood on the sharp object was very fresh. I understand that exposure to natural elements renders the virus ineffective but was not sure how soon  after the exposure to air.

Thank You and Have a good weekend
As GuitarRox said, there are 2 ways to really get HIV with the latter meaning sharing a sharp oject like a needle.   The reason for this is because inside the lumen of the needle (assuming it has blood infected with HIV), it contains blood that hasn't been exposed to air, and that needle filled with blood poses a risk.

But, if the blood on the sharp object was very fresh, then it would still be true that there was no risk.

meant to say...

..., if the blood on the sharp object (not including IV needle) was very fresh, then it would still be true that there was no risk.

So let's say we are talking about a sewing needle (it doesn't have a lumen/inside) and it has HIV blood on it and you accidently poke yourself then there is no risk for this.  e.g., sharp  objects like broken glass, small knife,  with fresh blood, does NOT pose a risk for HIV.  
Thank You
20620809 tn?1504362969
Here are the only risks for transmitting HIV which include having unprotected vaginal or anal sex or sharing IV drug needles to inject with.  These are the only risks.  Air inactivates the virus.  This is why something can 't touch you, even CUT you and transmit the virus.  Even if the blood appears fresh.  JessyJames is very right that this is ZERO risk. No one has ever gotten HIV this way in the history of HIV!  And there is a long history of research with HIV at this point.  People do not get HIV from an object that cuts them.  
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