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Ischemia, (Not CAD)! Dr. says mild heart defect..

Totally confused! I was lead to believe that I had CAD, as I read this is another term for Ischemia!? Anyhow, after speaking with the Cardiologist nurse, in scheduling an appointment, I was told I do not have CAD but rather a mild heart defect... WTF?

This has me mind boggled, "Not hard to do". Any insight? Here are my findings:

Myocardial Perfusion Scan:

Findings;

In the apical mid anterior wall, there is a mild to moderate severity and mild to moderate sized reversible defect.

Sum stress score 4
Sum difference score 4

Estimated Quantitative data after stress:

Ejection fraction: 68% (gated SPECT EF less than 45% abnormal; 45-49% equivocal; greater than 50% normal)
End diastolic volume: 82ml

Wall Motion: Normal

Impression: Patient exercised to functional class I with the target heart rate reached. At this workload, the myocardial perfusion scan is mildly abnormal with Ischemia in the LAD distribution.

Non smoker
5'10
Female
280 lbs now, was 305 Lbs. Went Vegan after findings lol
Non drinker
Addicted to coffee haha
IT computer programmer (Sedative)
Walk 30 minutes on treadmill or brisk walk outdoors daily

Dr recommended I be a leasurley lady at this time.
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