Aa
A
A
A
Close
Heart Disease Forum
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Avatar universal

Please help with echo report

I am a 51 yr. old female, athletic, normal weight, menopausal, thyroid cancer 2000 & free but tsh supressed at .02
I have been having PVC's for many years & had a completly normal echo in 10/09, nuclear stress test normal with workload of 10.2 mets after 9 min., 97% max. HR, SPECT normal in all regions.LV normal size, globalleft ventricular systolic function normal. No wall abnormalities..Resting EF>70%
This July I started getting increase in PVC's & had another echo which has had me concerned about the valves.
2D image: Mitral valve: Mildly thickened with mild annular calcification.
Aortic Valve: Mildly calcified leaflets with mild aortic root calcification.
Tricuspic vavle: mildly thickened
Summary: Normal LV systolic function, LVEF>60% No functionally significant valvular abnormalities. Measurements all Normal.
I had a repeat echo last month because I was concerned with these findings. It was slightly different this time.
Aortic valvue: Normal structure with mild arotic root calcification.
Summary: Normal LV systolic function, LVEF>60% No functionally significant valvular abnormalities. All measurements normal.
My CRP .2    LDL/HDL Ratio 1.44   Trig. 62
My doctor mumbled something about the tech & said he wasn't worried about these findings as he walked out. I am a bit of a health nut though & workout, eat right, & I am concerned. Can you please tell me if this is normal?  Do I need to ask for any tests, or is there anything I can do to reverse this?  Why was my doctor not concerned? Thanks!
7 Responses
Avatar universal
Hi Flippinpatty,

It's difficult to answer questions via the internet, particularly without seeing your echocardiograms myself, but I'll give you some thoughts.  First off, your cardiologist is correct in that there is no immediate concern with your echocardiograms.  We don't really know why patients get calcium deposition on their valves, but it often is seen as some patients age.  At this point, what you need to do is keep doing what you're doing: exercise, eat well, keep stress under control.  There is no need to get repeat echos every few months unless you begin to have symptoms that are concerning to your cardiologist, since calcium build up happens over a long period of time.  

In short, we often see echocardiograms similar to yours within your age group.

Hope this helps!
CCFHeartMD20


Avatar universal
Thank you for your quick response.How likely is this to progress?  Do I need to continue taking calcium supplements? I've read about the latest reserch & now wondering if that had anything to do with this. Does this give me a higher chance of having CAD?
Avatar universal
Hi Flippinpatty,

It is not uncommon for the calcification to worsen over time.  However, this is usually over many years.  I wouldn't anticipate it causing you problems until much, much later in life (if at all).  To put it in perspective, bout 30% of patients over the age of 65 has some mild calcium deposits as you do, so it's actually very common.

As to the calcium supplementation, this is an interesting question.  There is much debate over this, and there are studies that show an association between calcium supplementation and progression of valve disease.  I would discuss this with your cardiologist and your internist.  

Hope this helps!
CCFHeartMD20
Avatar universal
I am only 51 so for some reason I have gotten this early. It sounds like not many people have it at my age.
Avatar universal
In his first response, the doc noted that "we often see echocardiograms similar to yours within your age group. "

I've got some crud on my aortic valve (which causes mild regurgitation, so I do get a yearly exam), but like you, I have no symptoms related to valve failure.  After a while adjusting to the slightly shocking news that everything in the ticker was not baby-fresh and new, I have adjusted to the idea that unless I do develop symptoms (and I'm a gym rat, too), it's just a waste of time to fret a lot about it.

Avatar universal
I was shocked when I got my echo report in the mail & it stated mild calcifications on 3 valves & trivial regurgitation. I've read trivial is not much of anything, but a couple of years ago, I didn't have any of this.

I workout at least an hour 5 days a week, hard too...eat healthy, have good labs. My dad is 80 & he had a arteriogram a couple of years ago & the dr. said all his arteries were as clean as a whistle. Yea, I'm fretting...just really gets me when I do all this. Just think if I was a couch potatoe!

Did they put you on a statin, or give you any advise?
Avatar universal
They've tried me on statins four different times, and I developed muscle pains each time, severe enough to make me prefer an early death to continued treatment.

I also work out moderately five to six days per week, with 35 minutes of cardio and about 20 of weights.  The docs particularly encourage me in this.  I keep my weight down, but enjoy good food and a bit of wine each day.  This routine may--or may not--have kept me in pretty good working order for nearly ten years now.

i have discussed valve replacement with my cardio, if I should develop symptoms, but he says I seem stable and likely will not need it. Keep on doing what you're doing, he says.




Popular Resources
Is a low-fat diet really that heart healthy after all? James D. Nicolantonio, PharmD, urges us to reconsider decades-long dietary guidelines.
Can depression and anxiety cause heart disease? Get the facts in this Missouri Medicine report.
Fish oil, folic acid, vitamin C. Find out if these supplements are heart-healthy or overhyped.
Learn what happens before, during and after a heart attack occurs.
What are the pros and cons of taking fish oil for heart health? Find out in this article from Missouri Medicine.
How to lower your heart attack risk.