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Visible Suprasternal Neck Pulsation

I have had a visible pulse right above my collarbone area for the past month. People are always saying I have pale skin and I have no fat covering my collarbones. My suprasternal notch is very visible. As well as my neck muscles. I have a naturally strong heartbeat as well. I have a 58 resting heart rate when laying in bed. I was wondering if this is something bad? I recently noticed it. Never noticed it before. I also suffer from anxiety. It might be my anxiety making me hyper focus on it. When I am working I forget about it and go on with my day as Normal. I went to the doctor and she listened to my heart and didn’t say anytthing to me about it so I’m assuming I am fine. I don’t know what to do.
1 Responses
973741 tn?1342346373
That's always a little disconcerting when we can see our pulse!  There is something called bounding pulse.  You may be able to see your pulse because of a thin layer of skin there, no fat to cover it, etc.  But you also might have bounding pulse. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/322460.php  Lots of things causes it like anxiety, stress, fever, dehydration, hormonal imbalance, certain medications, allergic reactions, etc.  It would be a good idea just to check in with a doctor if this continues.  
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