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20794198 tn?1534533093

i have a fear of getting endocarditis age 25 - male

i have a severe concern at the moment around developing endocarditis. it stems from a strange rash on my palms i keep getting, around the time of dental work / problems.

december 14th 2017 i had a tooth extraction. all went well. until the 28th december i noticed i awoke to these little pinprick spots on my palms and some on my ankles. i had no symptoms prior to them and certainly none while they were accompanying me! doctors didnt have a clue. blood tests on 2 occasions came back normal, no infection or inflammation markers. i recovered after about a week

october 2018, i have noticed now i have the same pin prick like rash on my palms again! funnily enough i had some tooth pain and bleeding over the past few weeks every now and again as i am awaiting a root canal on the damaged tooth. dentists laugh me out the surgery when i mention endocarditis. im 25 years old, male, with absolutely no cardiac problems. ive had every heart test under the sun, except an mri!

the reason for my belief of endocarditis --- the little spots remind me a lot of janeway lesions.
the second reason --- always seems to be around dental problems or work.
the third reason --- lack of other symptoms of a virus/cold etc.
2 Responses
973741 tn?1342346373
This sounds very unlikely.  Have you considered getting some help for your anxiety?
1 Comments
hi, yeah ive had maybe 2 years in total of medications over the past 4/5 years for heart related issues. therapy ... cbt etc. the problem is that i already know WHAT symptoms to look out for and how its linked with dental problems.
Avatar universal
Have you posted before?
6 Comments
Yeah I have. Not about endocarditis though. Was about arvc. Since seen a specialist about that and was reassured. For how long I don't know?.

Endocarditis is logical thinking because I have had intermediate tooth bleeding over the past 4-5 weeks. Stage 1 root canal gone wrong!
Why does a tooth problem make you think you have endocarditis?
Because its very close to my chest. Its a bit harder for an infection on your extremities to reach your heart in such large quantities as opposed to your mouth. Its also been known for years that dental procedures have preceded endocarditis cases
Well, kind of.  They can... usually if you have some sort of anomaly like q l to r shunt bypassing a capillary bed which would allow pathogens to enter you lymphatic system.  

But unless your congenital or immunosuppresed I'm not sure why you think you have endocarditis.

Are you having symptoms of cardiac issues?  Dyspnea, tachypnea, chest pain,tachycardi, bradycardia etc?
I mean would allow pathogens to bypass the lymphatic
no, no anomalies as far as it goes. but who really knows what they have theyr genetic makeup unless it causes symptoms.

only in theory the little 'janeway rash' on my palms. i had it last year in december. i happened to have a molar taken out only 13 or 14 days before hand and had never in my 23 years of life had any sort of rash! the doctors couldnt actually tell me what it was. they first thought shingles, which soon swayed towards hand foot mouth, then to some kind of fungal infection. i had no symptoms of virus back then. this year i had the fever, light cough, sore throat, phlegm, the whole chabang!
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