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Breathing Problems/Gurgling Sensation

Hi, I'm a 14 year old girl who has been going through some breathing issues since the beginning of September ( trigger action) . Ever since my room was humid I felt like I couldn't breath and panicked. Ever since then my breathing has been off, although get its better than it was in September. But, I'd have to inhale deeply or yawn excessively to get a satisfying breath. Especially at night, when I want to sleep it gets worse. At school, since I'm occupied, it's not that noticeable but once I get home and start eating food it gets worse. Until the end of October, I went to the doc and she told me it might be a little bit of asthma since I had it when I was a baby. I have no cough by the way. I've been taking the inhalers she prescribed me but I'm not seeing a big improvement. And last night something weird happened... I was trying to sleep and when I'd feel myself get into REM sleep I feel like my body is shutting down and my breaths were getting shallow so I'd wake myself up. I got even more scared so by breathing got worse and I slept around 2 am. Someone plz help?:(
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Avatar universal
Forgot to mention, that night I also felt a weird bubbly feeling in my chest and throat sort of I can't even describe. The next day I still felt it but when I'm occupied not so much.that was new:(
1807132 tn?1318743597
It seems as though you may be a bit hyper focused on your breathing considering you felt a bit of panic about feeling like you could not breath.  A fear response can stay with us and wreak havoc on our life if we don't try to resolve it early on.  It is possible it is low grade asthma as well but since the inhalers are not working maybe go back to the doctor and tell them that they aren't working and that you are still having trouble breathing.  She could run a few tests and possibly send you for a sleep study since you seem to have a lot of the symptoms at night.  I think it might be good to have a chest xray done as well maybe even a heart monitor for a night but there is a good chance this is just some anxiety that you will need to work on.  I would suspect that even just having asthma as a baby with difficulty breathing could be something you might carry subconsciously with you.  The mind has a way of holding onto things like that.  One thing you could try with if your parents are willing to buy it for you is to get an O2 reader at the drug store.  They are fairly inexpensive and it might give you some peace of mind to see that you are getting enough oxygen when you feel it hard to breath.  As well they also read your heart rate so you could gauge a bit what it is beating at, if it is too slow, below 60 or too high, over 100.  But just so you know it is normal for the heart rate to slow down during sleep.  For many people the rate is below normal.  so it isn't always considered a problem.  Also food can elevate your heart rate a bit after eating as the body tries to adjust. This can be more noticeable after a meal high in carbohydrates or a big meal.  So maybe cut back a bit on how much you eat or what you are eating and see if that helps.   But if you still feel like you have something to be concerned about revisit your doctor and let them know you still have issues.  I suspect it may not be anything to worry too much about but it's always best to consult with a doctor about these things.  I hope you feel better soon.  
1807132 tn?1318743597
That should have read, as the body works to digest the food you ate the heart rate will elevate.
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