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11849443 tn?1441302841

RFA ablation svt

I meet with my cardiologist on the 17th, I want to ask him about ablation.
What questions would I ask?

I have a echo stress test on the 15th (freaked out they will find more heart problems)

For those who have had ablation I have a few questions if you don't mine.

What was it like to have it done?
Did it work?
How long did the procedure take?
Were you awake during the procedure?

Thanks for any info, I know I been blowing up the threads lately with questions...
10 Responses
1807132 tn?1318743597
Odds are extremely high that they will not find any heart disease so the less you stress the better you will feel.  If you would like to read about my ablation you can click on my name and read my journal entry.  I was quite terrified to do it but in the end it was a piece of cake.  I was awake but because I was active they were able to get the svt going on the first try and find the spot quickly so I was in and out in 2 hours when it usually takes at least 3 I was told. They offered to give stronger meds if I needed them which could have caused me to fall asleep but I didn't need them.  The ablation itself was a bit painful but not to the point of blinding pain but a deep pain as they burned off the extra pathway.  But it was quick once they got to that part so it wasn't too bad for me.  The hardest part was afterwards I had to lay still for 4 hours on my back.  I have back issues so by the end my back was starting to hurt pretty bad but as far as ablations go mine went as smoothly as they come. I did seem to have an increase of pvcs afterwards but i honestly can't say that I wasn't having as many prior to the ablation.  I was having a lot of daily jumpiness that I was ignoring so it is possible that I was just noticing the pvc activity more since the svt had been eliminated.   In any event, if it does turn out you have svt and are not just having a run of pacs and are offered an ablation your anxiety may work in your favor for once because it will make you more active when you go in which really is the biggest key for a quick successful ablation.  Ablations for svt have very high success rates.  I haven't had an episode since the ablation which is going on 4 years now on the 11th of this month.  And after a year my pvcs calmed down significantly.  But the healing is it a process that can take quite a while to happen for some.  But first things first, meet with the ep and see what they have to say.  Take care.
1423357 tn?1511085442
What was it like to have it done?
I don't know.  I was under general anesthesia and remember nothing aside from scooting onto the lab table.  I also had a syringe of Valium going to work on at that point, so it was pretty blurry at that point.

Did it work?
5 years.  So far, so good.

How long did the procedure take?
About four and a half hours from going under to waking up in the recovery room.

Were you awake during the procedure?
I remember absolutely nothing.... which is just the way I wanted it.
11849443 tn?1441302841
This is the kinda **** that freaks me out..

http://www.uwhealth.org/health/topic/decisionpoint/supraventricular-tachycardia-should-i-have-catheter-ablation/abo8474.html
1807132 tn?1318743597
What about the article scares you.  No medical procedure is without risk but the risk for ablation complications is no more than 2%.  That is better odds than if you were having an appendectomy which I believe may be around around 6% without rupture and 10% with rupture so you have almost perfect odds that nothing will go wrong. As well most eps know enough now to be cautious about ablating if the trouble spot is too close to vital areas.  Mine happened to be no where near the worrisome spot but that is the biggest concern where complications may come into play but if that is the case when they are doing the mapping if they find it is too much of a risk they very well won't ablate at all and will abort the procedure.  It would then be a matter of ablating if and only if the svt was so disruptive as to cause a person to not be able to function then an ablation and pacemaker may happen but if anything this article indicates that you have extremely high odds of success with little complication.  This said, you need to discuss with your doctor first whether or not your type of svt is even treatable at this point so do try to not over think things.  Go watch a funny movie to get your mind off things.  You will have answers before you know it.
11849443 tn?1441302841
Thanks again michellepetkus.

I do worry WAY to much I think sometimes.
Right now my wife is sick with some nasty cold and I'm doing my best to not get it since I think it will induce my SVT even worse.
This crap has affected my life so much....
11849443 tn?1441302841
So I'm having this ablation

Please run me through each step.
I heard my when I get the surgery that I will be naked and eveyone will see my penis :), is this true???

1423357 tn?1511085442
Your gear will be draped throughout the procedure whether you're awake, or asleep as I was.  But yup, there are going to be occasions when you may be briefly exposed.  Access to your heart will most likely be done on both sides of the groin area in the crease where your torso and leg join.  General anesthesia is great because you remember nothing.  The negative to this method is that they usually place a catheter in you so you can pass urine comfortably during recovery.  The catheter will be removed when youre ready to get dressed to go home.

Heres a free tip. (No pun intended).  Do yourself a favor and shave your entire region prior to going to the hospital.  If you don't, an orderly will, and there's nothing like an elderly lady grabbing the head of your penis, pull it our straight like the neck of a turtle, and proceed to shave it down.... dry.  You must shave the entire area, your groin, scrotum, and upper thighs.  It will be inspected after you're undressed and in a gown, and any leftover pubes will be eradicated!  I actually like the "effect" and continue to keep the area shorn today.  It's neat and clean! Remember that your junk is like my junk and a couple thousand other's junk who've passed through that hospital.  Just wait until you have your first prostate exam!
1423357 tn?1511085442
I know Michelle has a journal explaining the pricedure. I have one too.  I also recommend reading the journal of Jannie411.  She give a very good step by step of the procedure.  You should read them all!  Just type "Jannie411" in the search and it will take you to her journals.  You can get to Michelle and mine by clicking on our user name.
1423357 tn?1511085442
Your hospital may give you an antiseptic shower soap to use on the day of your procedure.  I was asked to use this soap on my entire body, then wipe my entire nether-region with an antiseptic impregnated pad prior to getting dressed for the hospital.  This is to minimize bacteria.

After your procedure, the puncture points will be covered with gauze and most likely a film bandage.  This can be removed usually the following day or two.  You will be surprised to find  that the two puncture points will just be two small red dots by then.
11849443 tn?1441302841
Thanks Tom, I will check out the Journals.

I also keep my gear shaved, I will give it a good trimming before I go in.

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1807132 tn?1318743597
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