Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Blood Transmission

Hello, one of my roommate has HIV, and hepatitis(HBV or HCV I'm not quite sure). I was told that HIV is not a concern but HCV can be a risk to us. So I've been hanging around in this community for some days and I saw all the answers about blood transmission are like "no risk". But I wonder why sharing things like toothbrush can be risky when you guys said that the virus has to get into one's bloodstream to infect him. I thought toothbrush can't reach one's bloodstream. My situation is pretty like those posts about pimples. We all squeeze pimples, his blood got on the doorknob or something else and we touch those things and then we touch our wounds...... If this is not a risk, why sharing toothbrush is? What are the differences?

6 Responses
Avatar universal
I know you may hate such kind of questions, but please? We are really worried...
Avatar universal
A toothbrush can be a problem because it can have blood on it and if the other person's mouth has bleeding gums, blood can enter the bloodstream. No one here has ever said blood transmission is no risk. I believe you are misunderstanding. Blood transmission is the only risk. Infected blood has to get in to the bloodstream of a non-infected person to transmit the virus.

People who are uneducated often think that touching something a hepatitis person has touched, can make the virus enter through something like chapped hands. There is no risk there. Most of us have families and have had hep C for years, even decades, and our families do not have hepatitis C. Blood enters the bloodstream from things like sharing IV drug needles and works; getting tattoos or piercings using unsterilized needles and inks; having rough sex that causes bleeding, using someone's personal hygeine articles like razors and toothbrushes, etc. There is no documented case of the virus being transmitted the way you describe. However, I would tell the roommate to be more careful about cleaning up and to cover his wounds with a bandaid.

I am sure someone will come along with more advice for you.
Avatar universal
Thank you very much for your explanation. But I still didn't understand the difference between contaminated toothbrush and contaminated doorknob......they can both bring virus into my wound, then bloodstream can't they? Please allow me to describe again, specifically.

I fear that, he squeezes pimples, blood on his hand(very little maybe invisible), then he touches the doorknob, I touch the doorknob, then I squeeze pimples. Does this series of actions may leads to blood contact? Or does this series of actions just lessen the virus to on risk?
Avatar universal
Blood hanging around on exterior surfaces such as a doorknob doesn't usually stay as active as it would if you stuck an infected needle in a vein.
The situation you are describing is rather benign.  If your scenario were true this virus would become an epidemic and we could never leave our home as everyone would touch a surface.
It's more immediate blood to blood contact.  If your roommate shaved and was bleeding on his razor and then you used it and bled also, then yes you could test positive.  Even having sex is low risk.  Both partners would have to be bleeding in order for transmission to occur.
Eating, kissing, for instance are considered non risk.  Perhaps it could possibly occur if everyone is bleeding, but not likely.  You can equate it to getting struck by lightening to some degree.  Can it happen if you go outside and its raining?  Guess so, but not likely.
.....Kim
Avatar universal
Thank you for the explanation.
Avatar universal
Livelife gave you an excellent explanation. I think the difference between a contaminated doorknob and a contaminated toothbrush is....a doorknob can't poke you and get blood into an open wound. A bristle on a toothbrush can poke your gum tissues and get virus in to your bloodstream. Also, it is highly unlikely a doorknob would become contaminated in a way that it could transmit the virus.
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Hepatitis C Community

Top Hepatitis Answerers
317787 tn?1473358451
DC
683231 tn?1467323017
Auburn, WA
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Answer a few simple questions about your Hep C treatment journey.

Those who qualify may receive up to $100 for their time.
Explore More In Our Hep C Learning Center
image description
Learn about this treatable virus.
image description
Getting tested for this viral infection.
image description
3 key steps to getting on treatment.
image description
4 steps to getting on therapy.
image description
What you need to know about Hep C drugs.
image description
How the drugs might affect you.
image description
These tips may up your chances of a cure.
Popular Resources
For people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), the COVID-19 pandemic can be particularly challenging.
A list of national and international resources and hotlines to help connect you to needed health and medical services.
Here’s how your baby’s growing in your body each week.
These common ADD/ADHD myths could already be hurting your child
This article will tell you more about strength training at home, giving you some options that require little to no equipment.
In You Can Prevent a Stroke, Dr. Joshua Yamamoto and Dr. Kristin Thomas help us understand what we can do to prevent a stroke.