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HCV TREATMENT WITH NONREACTIVE HBV

I have recently been diagnosed with Hepatitis C by my PCP.  I was sent to the Gastroenterologist which tested for Hepatitis B before I start my Hep C treatment with Epclusa and I was found to have NONREACTIVE Hep B. Which I guess I was infected at one time but it is nonreactive. I was also found to have Fibrosis stage F2.

My question is has anyone gone thru Hep C treatment with having nonreactive Hep B? If so did it reactivate the Hep B?
My Gastroenterologist has me taking the Hep B vaccine to lessen the risk of activating Hep B.
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683231 tn?1467323017
I would ask your doctor about your hep B status but I’m pretty sure non reactive means you were never infected nor do you have any immunity to hep B so you need to be vaccinated to hep b to prevent any future infection but please confirm this with your doctor
Helpful - 1
683231 tn?1467323017
I didn’t have hep B but I’ll do my best to answer as there aren’t many people around here anymore.

But to answer your question has anyone gone through hep C treatment with non reactive hep B, I’m sure many have.

From what I’ve found a bout Hep B testing I don’t think having a non reactive means you were previously infected. I believe it means you were never infected but I am not a medical professional.

Here is some info I found about hep B testing and a link

“ 1. Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) – The "surface antigen" is a protein found on the surface of
the hepatitis B virus that is present in the blood of someone who is infected. If this test is positive or "reactive," then the hepatitis B virus is present.

2. Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (HbsAb or Anti-HBs) – The "surface antibody" is formed in response to the hepatitis B virus. Your body can make this antibody if you have been vaccinated, or if you have recovered from a hepatitis B infection. If this test is positive or "reactive," then your immune system has successfully developed a protective antibody against the hepatitis B virus. This will provide long-term protection against future hepatitis B infection. Someone who is HBsAb+ is not infected and cannot pass the virus to others.

3. Hepatitis B Core Antibody (HBcAb or Anti-HBc) – This antibody does not provide any protection or immunity against the hepatitis B virus. A positive or "reactive" test indicates that a person may have been infected with
the hepatitis B virus at some point in time. This test is often used by blood banks to screen blood donation, however, all three test results are needed to make a diagnosis.”

http://www.hepb.org/assets/Uploads/Understanding-Your-Hepatitis-B-Blood-Tests.pdf

I’m pretty sure the reason for getting vaccinated for you is to prevent future infection.

For people who were infected with hep B there is a small risk of the hep B virus being reactivated. But that is not a frequent side effect of hep C treatment.

I found this from a medical study.

“ Around 30 cases of hepatitis B re-activation have been reported to date among the many thousands of patients treated.”

Here is some information about Epclusa from the manufacture patient FAQ

https://www.epclusa.com/faq

Best of luck with treatment
Helpful - 1
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317787 tn?1473358451
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