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Interpreting hep c rna test results

I can’t figure out what my test results mean. Can someone help?

Test name:
Hepatitis c an with refl to hcv rna, qn pcr

Results:

Antibody non-reactive

Signal to cutoff 0.01%

What does this mean?


2 Responses
683231 tn?1467323017
Antibody non reactive means there was no hepatitis c antibodies detected in your blood. If your concerning exposure event where Hepatitis c infected blood could have entered your blood stream was more than 12 weeks before you had the testing done that would indicate you haven’t been exposed to hepatitis c.

If you tested sooner than 12 weeks after your potential exposure you should wait until 12 weeks have passed and retest.
9 Comments
Got it. So it is a window exposure concern. Thank you. I thought .01% meant they found some virus on me.
No it does not. The signal cut off is the tests sensitivity. You had no hepatitis c antibodies detected so if it had been more than 12 weeks after an exposure concern you do not have hep c.

Did you share IV drug needles  less than 12 weeks ago, get a tattoo in an unlicensed tattoo parlor, engage in rough sexual practices or have multiple sex partners, are you a health care worker who experienced an accidental needle stick involving a patient with known hep c infection? If you have none of those scenarios in your situation or any other manner which hep c infected blood could have entered your blood stream you are not at risk of having contracted hepatitis c.
There is no testing window concern per se, I just wanted to add the disclaimer to my comments that if you tested too early before 12 weeks the test is less accurate. If your test was more than 12 weeks after an exposure then your body would have had time to make enough antibodies to rise to detectable levels.
I had sex with a prostitution  and the condom broke.  But from what I understand, hep c is not transmitted through vaginal sex.
I had sex with a prostitution  and the condom broke.  But from what I understand, hep c is not transmitted through vaginal sex.

Apparently the test is not 100% conclusive for some reason, or they would not recommend further testing based on outside circumstances.
The antibody test is very accurate if performed at least 12 weeks post a concerning exposure. If the antibody test is negative at 12 weeks post exposure no further testing is required.

As far as sex with a prostitute while hep c is blood born and normally blood is not exchanged in routine sex sexual relations with multiple partners is a known risk. Your sex partner has sexual relations with many people so that could be considered a potential risk. However, if not engaging in rough sex like BDSM or blood sports where blood could be exchanged. If that was not the case you would have a lessor risk from what you described.

But in any event if your test was performed more than 12 weeks after this event your antibody test result of negative is reasonably conclusive and no additional testing is needed.

Bearing in mind I am not a medical professional I am a patient who had hepatitis C for many years. For real medical advice consult with your personal physician
Who are you seeing that is recommending further testing after testing negative for a hep c antibody test? No medical professional that I know of would.
No one is recommending. It just said on the test something about no further testing necessary unless I am a high risk group. I don't think I am.  
High risk would be IV drug users, those who have multiple sex partners, and those who engage in rough sexual practices or if you are aware on a situation where hepatitis c infected blood could enter your blood stream

Otherwise you are not in a high risk group
Avatar universal
Thank you by the way.
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