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MS and Barometric Pressure

Hi, I am wondering if anyone else with Multiple Sclerosis feels that Barometric Changes in the weather affects their symptoms?
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Avatar universal
I have been wondering about barometric pressure and how it may affect MS, which I have been dealing with since 2005. The longer I have had it the more I  Have noticed or experienced an increase in the severity of my symptoms, such as increased chest hug or difficulty breathing, when it’s hot and humid. When it’s cold here in Michigan it can be hard to move when outside for log periods of time. I’m going to be Paying more attention to the BP to see if I notice any trends for me.  
Thanks for all the info.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Yes! When it's raining, a front is coming thru or severe weather. My fatigue gets so much worse! I've noticed increased pain with cold weather... I'm glad you asked this question because I can't find any research to support my claim and I was starting to feel crazy...
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Avatar universal
I personally in my 34 years of having MS weather change as a storm is coming in and leaving cause me severe leg, neck and back pain. I am trying different things and it is a temp relief but I found working out helps the most
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Avatar universal
Absolutely!  Winter months are the worst. Barometric changes extreme real havoc on my body. Doctors have not got a clue which I have met. I follow the barometric changes  like a hawk Plan my day accordingly.
I was diagnosed with MS 20 years ago. Taking no medication  since 2008 managing through diet,  supplements,  lifestyle changes.. ie  reducing stress, getting plenty of sleep  and have been managing quite well since I fired my neurologists in 2008.

Dealing with barometric  pressure changes has been by far my biggest concern.

Vit C  15 grams daily
Magnesium  - Relaxes the body among other benefits
Omega-3 -  managing inflammation

Green Tea and  plenty of water

Everyone is different you have to figure out your own quantities suggest you use high-quality supplements.

Best of luck!

Be well,

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Avatar universal
Thank goodness for this post! I thought I'd been imagining things. I've only been diagnosed with MS for 8 years and since being told i have secondary progressive I have been bad when the pressure is low and intolerable when it's high. I feel better when it's somewhere inbetween so (most) summers on the north east coast of England can be on the pleasant side. Anyway, like I said, I have thought I was going potty associating my symptoms with the weather. Thank you, and for all the answers to this post as they have been very enlightening.
Helpful - 0
1 Comments
Are you new to our group. If so welcome. Barometric cancer has always effected me.
Alex
Avatar universal
cyclone Marcia has formed over the last 2 days    here in  South-'east Queensland     Australia  20 2 2015     I have been more fatigued than normal   [multiple sclerosis] --    wondered if air pressure    had anything to do with it  -    google  -  cyclones  have very low air pressure  -  then googled multiple sclerosis and low air pressure      and    voila   all the comments above       thanks everybody

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Avatar universal
I havent figured out what is wrong with me yet, however I have noticed a difference in weather and storm fronts.

I have been walking better since its gotten cooler. The heat this year really kicked my rump. Lately been having cool fronts come and go and i have noticed calves of my legs aching really bad.
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Avatar universal
Oh, yes. The Barometric airpressure affects me for sure. I've had Multiple Sclerosis for 17 years. I had relapse after relapse one year. By the time they stopped, I couldn't move or feel anything. When I starting getting stronger and was getting some feeling back and then the pain kicked in. I Was asked what time of the day did my pain occur. I Couldn't answer that because it was all over the place. I don't know why, but I thought maybe the weather played a part in it. I tracked the weather for a year documenting the dew point, temperatures, air pressure,and wind along with my symptoms. I found a pattern between high and low pressure as well as temperature.

When the air pressure is low I am stiff, spastic,cramped up, and have insurmountable fatigue. I Always cry when the air pressure drops and I'm not sad. When the air pressure is high, I feel weak, ache all over, I am sensitive to touch, loud sounds, and other peoples energy. When the pressure changes quickly, my ears pop.

When the temperature is cold, I am stiff and spastic. When the temperature is warm, I am weak, I feel nauseous, dizzy, numb, and muscle cramps.

I live in Minnesota where changes in weather can be extreme often. I have a small window that feels just right. 29.95-30.15 inches for air pressure and 70-75 degrees with a dew point in the mid-fouties.. I feel almost normal under those conditions.
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Avatar universal
I've not hadd been dx'd with ms, but with fibromyalgia for 25 yrs.  It's very clear to me that a change in pressure can make me very, very sick beginning approx. 24 hours before it begins.  I've been experiencing constant twitching in my left arm for the past 2 days as a low pressure moves through Arizona and have been feeling terrible with constant pain in my ribs and chest.

I live in Phoenix and a few weeks ago we drove to the Grand Canyon, which is quite and change in altitude.  The next morning I woke with the worst pain I can remember and with a migraine.  I've had that sort of thing happen before as we travel to Montana in the summer, but was never really sure whether it was altitude.  I've convinced now that it is definitely is.

I have very accuraate barometer and have charted this for many years.  I would love to have a real scientific answer for why it happens...I just know that it does!

Here's hoping for some good answers.  I've asked several doctors, but never get any real info!

Linda
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Avatar universal
I am in Illinois.
I have been charting for about a year.
I find that when the B.P is about 30.0 or above, my symptoms, especially pain in feet and legs, goes WAY up.
Any drastic changes cause me lots of pain.
Cindy
Helpful - 0
147426 tn?1317265632
Khiba mentioned something important.  The barometric pressure goes slightly up and down all day.  So if you look at a barometer at one time and it is falling it is easy to think that is why you hurt that minute.  However, an hour later it bay blip upward and you might not see it.  You can go nuts with the up/down/up/down.  Try to find what the overall trend is before you start associating symptoms with it.

What most people respond to is the "trend" downward over many, many hours or days.

A possibly silly side note.  Mount St. Helens is literally in my back yard - about 40 miles north of me.  When it was active, a few years ago, I swear that my vertigo was worst during periods of highest seismic activity.

Quix
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2 Comments
Hi it’s been along time since I visited this site . However I do remember reading your insights on MS
Nba2kfan, i'm sorry to tell you but Quix hasn't been active on medhelp for a number of years now, if you have a question i'd be happy to try and answer it for you!

Cheers......JJ

ps if you do, please start a new question thread so it doesn't get lost within an a very old post..ta
755322 tn?1330269114
I can predict the weather by the way I feel! In Houston, the barometric pressure is all over the place sometimes many times a day. When it falls, i feel much worse, fatigue wise, pain wise, dizziness wise. When its high, i feel so much better!
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Avatar universal
Hi folks,
Lovely to get your feedback. Temperature dropped dramatically here this morning and my neuropathic pain is so highly reduced so I know I've hit on something. I've had an air conditioner installed but also find my Arctic Vest invluable on humidnights.
Helpful - 0
338416 tn?1420045702
Ooh, altitude sickness - yeah, she could have been experiencing the 'Rocky Mountain High.'

I have a weird issue with pressure sensation in my ears, and I think I'm also affected by barometric pressure.  Now that I know it's a possibility, I'll keep an eye on the weather.
Helpful - 0
1220551 tn?1269112178
This is crazy- I've been in my recliner all day wondering the same thing. Thank you for asking.

I was starting to feel a little better Sunday but yesterday and today was much worse. I can hardly stand up straight today much less walk. My fatigue is horrible today too - I'm having trouble holding my eyes open.

~ Stella
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147426 tn?1317265632
Denver is high enough that she could have been having altitude sickness.   There really is less oxygen at a mile up.  Add that to a brain already struggling and I can that a brain shutting right down.

A falling barometric pressure doesn't affect the oxygen being delivered to the brain, but briefly causes the pressure inside the inner ear/brain to be higher than the outside.  Some people (with vertigo) also complain when the pressure goes the other way.  I haven't noticed that in me.

Q
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1207048 tn?1282174304
Oh goodness! I just looked at the weather for my town, and a storm is predicted for Friday (70% chance of rain both friday & saturday) and today the pressure is falling. Could this be why I've had slight feelings of vertigo the last couple days? Can I expect it to get worse over the week? I never would have even thought! Crazy!

~Jess
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338416 tn?1420045702
I have a friend with neurological problems, currently undiagnosed.  She went up to Denver, and found that her brain completely shut down - they had to go back down a couple of hundred feet before she felt better.
Helpful - 0
147426 tn?1317265632
Since I have both chronic peripheral and chronic central vertigo, I notice that a "drop" in the barometric pressure sends me reeling - maybe why I've been stumbling worse yesterday and today and a balmy sunny period turns back to our typical rainy spring.  

Others have mentioned this, with vertigo at least.

Quix
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1040373 tn?1273687488
Yes! It always makes me feel worse. Maybe I'm just crazy but I have noticed this.
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Avatar universal
Welcome to our MS forum, furpurs. I haven't heard of anyone speak of barometric pressure changes in terms of MS, though of course that doesn't mean others haven't wondered about it.

I see that you're a long-time MS patient, with lots of experience dealing with the serious or sometimes just odd reactions we get. We'd love to hear more of your story.

ess
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1 Comments
I have defiantly noticed that. Have had a horrible time last couple of weeks. Increased pain, stumbling more, etc. Today we are having a cool spell and I heard the weatherman day the pressure is up, so that makes me a believer.
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