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Avatar universal

Frustrated and looking for answers

I am a 34 year old female. I have been having problems for at least the last 3 years, and have been unable to get a diagnosis, with the exception of Fibromyalgia.

I have back pain, severe muscle spasms in my back, neck and shoulders. These developed three years ago, and then was shortly followed by horrible fatigue. Blood work and MRI's have all been negative. I have been tested for Lupus, Sjorgen's, and Lyme Disease - just to name a few. All blood work is normal. I am hypothyroid, but it is controlled on Synthroid. I am not depressed. Iron levels are normal, adrenal functions are normal. MRI's of my c-spine, t-spine L-Spine show degenerative changes, and some cervical straightening, but nothing more. MRI of my brain has been unremarkable. Last MRI was 2006.

In the last 2 months, I have developed a swelling in my right thigh. It was painful the first day, and felt fluid filled. Now, still swollen, but feels more firm. My skin has become extremely dry, and my lips painfully chapped. I've been drinking enough water, and using the best moisturizers, but no relief. I've been having episodes of dizziness, and feeling like I'm going to pass out, but I don't. I have been feeling 'fuzzy headed' and sometimes have trouble finding the words I want to say, and also I mix words up. I get confused easily, have noticed changes in my behavior, such as increased irritability. I also have a decreased attention span.

I have an appointment with a neurologist on Friday. I am looking for some ideas as to what this could be to point me in the right direction. I'm so tired of hearing it's all in my head.

Thank You!
Kris
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Avatar universal
Hi there.

These things are not just in your head.  I can understand your situation and all that I can come up with (diagnosing myself) is also, fibromyalgia.  One of the explanations for this is called non-restorative sleep.  This is a situation where we close our eyes at night but not able to achieve a level of sleep to allow our muscles and entire body to recover.  This is why we feel tired, light headed, and experience all of these pains.  However, the swelling on your thigh may not be part of this syndrome.  This could be due to some vascular obstruction such as deep vein thrombosis.  This could also be a sign or cellulitis, or infection in some deep structures underneath the thigh skin.  

I suggest you discuss these options with your neurologist.  Also ask him regarding some form of anti-depressant drugs like amitriptylline or trimipramine as this will help us get restorative sleep (this worked for me).  

Take care and God bless.
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Avatar universal
I'm so sorry to hear your pain.   I have a similar situation were I have had and abnormal EMG for my neck, arms and hands.  I went to an orthopedic because my neck was popping so much and because of the head and neck pain.  But he found no problem on the MRI.  But that doesn't explain anything.  He summed everything up in 5 minutes (that I need physical therapy).  I know this probably doesn't answer your question but I can relate to doctors treating me like it's in my head.  I hope the neurologist can help you too.
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