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Should I be concerned about dementia

I've had a recent history (child history of trauma, injury and other issues) of seizures. After CT's, MRI's and several VEEG's I have been diagnosed with PNES or non-epileptic seizures. I believe that this diagnosis is right since I've previously been diagnosed by a therapist with PTSD, dissociative amnesia and conversion disorder (they referred me to the neurologists for further evaluation of the seizures). It's been about two years since the onset and increase of the seizures. They have become progressively worse and after my diagnosis they seem consistent with what is happening. My question is related to this, my husband has said he believes that I might be experiencing dementia. I'm 41 years old with no known history of dementia in my family since I don't have a good relationship with family. After going over some medical records this morning and reviewing what they said, I've become concerned because in the MRI Brain w/o Contrast report it says:

"Brain parenchyma: There are a few tiny scattered foci of abnormal hyperintense T2/FLARE signal in the cerebral hemispheric white matter. The brain parenchyma is otherwise normalThere is no diffusion restriction. There is a focal 5 mm focus of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity in the mesial right temporal lobe just superior to the right hippocampus. The hippocampi are symmetric and demonstrate normal signal intensity.

....

IMPRESSION

There is a 5 mm focus of increased T2 signal intensity in the mesial right temporal lobe of uncertain etiology and significance. This is located superior to the right hippocampus. Correlate with EEG findings. Further evaluation with contrast enhancement recommended. The bilateral hippocampi are symmetric and demonstrate normal signal intensity with no evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis.

Scattered tiny foci of hyperintense T2/FLAIR signal in the white matter which are non-specific. Possible causes include chronic migraine headaches, microvascular ischemia, and inflammatory conditions."

I looked up "microvascular ischemia" because I didn't know what it meant and when it mentioned dementia I became very concerned because this is what my spouse has described my increased lapses in memory as. Forgetting people, thing, conversations and even our address. We felt after the diagnosis with PNES with dissociation being a part of my diagnosis that my deteriorating memory could just be a feature of my dissociation. But reading this has me concerned, I would like to move on with the diagnosis and get the mental health help I need to treat PNES but I am concerned about this one MRI.

The question I have for people who might know is if I should be evaluated for dementia or is this just that doctor listing possible causes of things on the MRI even though it's not likely or probable. This MRI was done in June 2021 and my most recent VEEG visit was this month.I had a CT w/o Contrast in September of 2020 and the findings were "Brain parenchyma: The brain parenchyma demonstrates normal gray-white differentiation."

I'm obviously concerned because I don't want to run the risk of having dementia since I've known people with dementia and I know it can get bad fast. Could someone tell me the probability that these notes I've included might indicate dementia and could dementia be the reason why for much of my life I have been seizure free even with my history but only recently started experiencing PNES seizures? I know I don't deal with my problems well and never have instead I simply put them aside and move on without focusing on them. This is why the dissociation thing has taken me back a bit. I thought I moved past all of that already. Apparently I haven't. Is it possible that if I have dementia my control over myself is slipping due to dementia and this is allowing things that I thought long resolved to come back and to manifest as PNES?I've had a recent history (child history of trauma, injury and other issues) of seizures. After CT's, MRI's and several VEEG's I have been diagnosed with PNES or non-epileptic seizures. I believe that this diagnosis is right since I've previously been diagnosed by a therapist with PTSD, dissociative amnesia and conversion disorder (they referred me to the neurologists for further evaluation of the seizures). It's been about two years since the onset and increase of the seizures. They have become progressively worse and after my diagnosis they seem consistent with what is happening. My question is related to this, my husband has said he believes that I might be experiencing dementia. I'm 41 years old with no known history of dementia in my family since I don't have a good relationship with family. After going over some medical records this morning and reviewing what they said, I've become concerned because in the MRI Brain w/o Contrast report it says:

"Brain parenchyma: There are a few tiny scattered foci of abnormal hyperintense T2/FLARE signal in the cerebral hemispheric white matter. The brain parenchyma is otherwise normalThere is no diffusion restriction. There is a focal 5 mm focus of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity in the mesial right temporal lobe just superior to the right hippocampus. The hippocampi are symmetric and demonstrate normal signal intensity.

....

IMPRESSION

There is a 5 mm focus of increased T2 signal intensity in the mesial right temporal lobe of uncertain etiology and significance. This is located superior to the right hippocampus. Correlate with EEG findings. Further evaluation with contrast enhancement recommended. The bilateral hippocampi are symmetric and demonstrate normal signal intensity with no evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis.

Scattered tiny foci of hyperintense T2/FLAIR signal in the white matter which are non-specific. Possible causes include chronic migraine headaches, microvascular ischemia, and inflammatory conditions."

I looked up "microvascular ischemia" because I didn't know what it meant and when it mentioned dementia I became very concerned because this is what my spouse has described my increased lapses in memory as. Forgetting people, thing, conversations and even our address. We felt after the diagnosis with PNES with dissociation being a part of my diagnosis that my deteriorating memory could just be a feature of my dissociation. But reading this has me concerned, I would like to move on with the diagnosis and get the mental health help I need to treat PNES but I am concerned about this one MRI.

The question I have for people who might know is if I should be evaluated for dementia or is this just that doctor listing possible causes of things on the MRI even though it's not likely or probable. This MRI was done in June 2021 and my most recent VEEG visit was this month.I had a CT w/o Contrast in September of 2020 and the findings were "Brain parenchyma: The brain parenchyma demonstrates normal gray-white differentiation."

I'm obviously concerned because I don't want to run the risk of having dementia since I've known people with dementia and I know it can get bad fast. Could someone tell me the probability that these notes I've included might indicate dementia and could dementia be the reason why for much of my life I have been seizure free even with my history but only recently started experiencing PNES seizures? I know I don't deal with my problems well and never have instead I simply put them aside and move on without focusing on them. This is why the dissociation thing has taken me back a bit. I thought I moved past all of that already. Apparently I haven't. Is it possible that if I have dementia my control over myself is slipping due to dementia and this is allowing things that I thought long resolved to come back and to manifest as PNES?
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