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Avatar universal

shoulder problems after flu shot

I was just reading about the guy that had a flu shot in his shoulder joint. I too had a flu shot in my shoulder joint, giveninto the joint itself by a student nurse. That was in November 2006. I have since had surgery in August 2007. Then a manipulation in April 2008 for postop frozen shoulder. I'm still having a considerate amount of pain. A ultrasound last week shows some bursitis. If I do any exercise or activity my whole arm will ache. I have constant pain. How  long is this going to go on? I can't work right now because I am unable to lift the required 50 lbs. I was in a way relieved to find other people that have had similar problems because my doctor had never heard of it happening.
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Avatar universal
Hello,

Before I provide an answer specific to your case a couple of questions from me.
1. How "young" are you?
2. Are you a smoker?
3. Do you have other medical problems? (for example, diabetes or high blood pressure)

~•~ Dr. Parks

This answer is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. The information presented in this posting is for patients’ education only. As always, I encourage you to see your personal physician for further evaluation of your individual case.
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
I am a nurse and work in the presurg area of the hospital. At this time I am requited to lift 50 lbs to continue to work, so as of now I haven't worked since the end of February.  I have a 20-25 lb wt restriction.
From my memory the surgery back in August 2007 was a decompression, cleaning out all of the gunk in there,tightening
the area, and repairing a slap tear.
The tech doing my ultrasound said that the bursa looked swollen, indicating a bursitis, but when the radiologist read it he didn't mention it,so my MD said when I saw him this week.
I appreciate the fact that you say it is rare for the injection to go into the shoulder joint. I didn't watch the student give the injection to begin with, but when I turned my head the needle had stopped and at that time I really couldn't tell where the injection was but the needle mark was the evidence. I think the needle hit the bone, because when I looked the needle had stopped. He then moved the needle a little and pushed it on in. When you haven't been watching everything from the start the landmarks can seem off at first glance. Whatever happened, I have had pain ever since, unfortunately.
I've started taking a swim class and that has seemed to help more than some of the other exercises, so will continue.
Thanks for your input.
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
Hi. Thanks for providing the additional information.

The reason why I asked these questions is that smoking, diabetes, and age all adversely affect the healing process.

That being said, the recovery following manipulation under anesthesia for post-operative frozen shoulder can be rather lengthy (as your surgeon has likely explained).

Although physical therapy and your home exercises cause significant pain and discomfort, it is really important to work with your physical therapist (who should be in communication with your surgeon) to safely push through the discomfort so that you can regain range of motion and functional use of your shoulder.

The time line for you could be up to 12 months before you reach maximum medical improvement. However, the first few months after your most recent surgery will be the most critical in terms of the progress you make with range of motion, strength, and function.

What type of shoulder surgery did you have in 2007? and, what type of work do you do?

It is rather rare for vaccinations to be given into the shoulder joint and it is even more rare for the injection to cause significant problems. Nevertheless, I am sure your clinical course is quite frustrating and uncomfortable.

I encourage you to stay positive and make every attempt to continue efforts to regain range of motion and function in your shoulder.

~•~ Dr. Parks

This answer is not intended as and does not substitute for medical advice. The information presented in this posting is for patients’ education only. As always, I encourage you to see your personal physician for further evaluation of your individual case.
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
I'm 55 years old.
I do not smoke or drink.
I have no other medical problems.
I have broken ribs several times over the past 15 years.
I have a chronic low back problem for the past 5 or 6 years.
Helpful - 0

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