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Torm glenoid labrum

I have had shoulder pain for about 3 to 4 months. My doctor sent me for an MRI about a week ago. He is currently out of town, so I have not been back to see him yet. I picked up my MRI report today. I am wondering what I can expect next; surgery, phys therapy, nothing at all?
The report says (paraphrased):

- nondisplaced tear of the posterior aspect of the glenoid labrum and ending from about posterior margin of the bicipital labral complex posteriorly downward to about 4:00 position of glenoid labrum.

- rotator cuff intact and unremarkable

- significant degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint with marked thickening and adema of capsule and marrow edema on both sides of joint.
3 Responses
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
You are advised to take an appointment near your orthopaedician and go for conservative treatment initially. Your group of muscles which control the shoulder joint called the rotator cuff muscles are intact and the damage is in the joint cavity called the glenoid cavity where you have a nondisplaced tear of the labrum/membrane. For pain take some anti inflammatory drugs/pain killers intermittently till you have an appointment with your physician. Take care!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thank you. I am not to distressed about this issue. I will see my doc. next week. I was curious about what to expect. I assume my doctor's response will be similar if not the same as yours. I greatly appreciate you responding to my post. I have been taking ibuprofin (400 to 600 mg) 1 to 2 times per day. I will continue to due so.

Again, thank you!
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
There are different types of labral tears viz: SLAP tears, Bankart lesions and Posterior labral tears. Posterior labral tears are less common, but sometimes seen in athletes in a condition called internal impingement. In this syndrome, the rotator cuff and labrum are pinched together in the back of the shoulder, but you are lucky you have a posterior labral tear but your rotator cuff is intact.
The treatment of a torn labrum depends on the type of tear that has occurred, yours it is posterior. Most labral tears do not require surgery; however, in patients who have persistent symptoms despite more conservative treatments, surgery may be necessary.
They do an arthroscopic surgery for this where the torn labrum which is made of a thick tissue which is torn has to be stiched.
Take care and come back to us on further queries.
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