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swimming- Amoeba

I went swimming 5 days ago in a lake, i dont think any water went up my nose, but i did swallow/choke on some 2 or 3 times. I wasnt really worried until i saw the news, I live in Texas, so the lake water was warm. I thought i was in the clear until one article said it can take up to 12 days for it to kill you.
Maybe I am paranoid, but i would rather be paranoid then die in a couple of days, since you almost never know you have it until it is too late, and there has only been one successful cure for it. Should i pay to go to the Doctor just in case, or should i wait and see if i get any of the symtoms? What are the symtoms? Any advice would help, Thanks
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Avatar universal
I am 14 by the way, and i know at least 2 out of the 3 people who died were under 18, i dont know if there was a reason for that, or if it was just chance, but i thought i would mention it.
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi,
How are you? You may be referring to Naegleria fowleri infection, a single-cell, microscopic organism found in such freshwater bodies as lakes, rivers, hot springs and, occasionally, in neglected, unchlorinated swimming pools. This can invade and attack the human nervous system may cause death. The initial symptoms include, but are not limited to, changes in taste and smell, headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck. Secondary symptoms include confusion, hallucinations, lack of attention, ataxia, and seizures. After the start of symptoms, the disease progresses rapidly over 3 to 7 days. Check with your doctor if you have these symptoms and to ease any anxiety. Take care and do keep us posted.
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