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Congenital pulmonary airway malformation

I am a 32 y old female, healthy with no previous respiratory problems/infections. I had recent left sided chest pain which lasted for 2 days, it initially felt like really bad GERD as I have GI issues-but I ended up in the ER to get checked to be safe. They ran a chest CT and found that I have congenital pulmonary airway malformation of the left upper lobe-the er doc said it likely did not correlate to my chest pain, everything else was normal…- does anyone have information about this In adults? The ER doc said to f/u with my pcp for further testing… I will paste the CT results below if anyone has further interpretation .

Lungs and pleura:
There is congenital pulmonary airway malformation involving the left
upper lobe with abnormal decreased lung attenuation in the left upper
lobe apical and anterior segments.  There is cystic dilatation of the
central airways involving the left upper lobe apical and anterior
segments without discernible connection to the tracheobronchial tree.  
The vascular supply of the left upper lobe apical and anterior segments
arises from the left main pulmonary artery.  The lingula has a normal
bronchoalveolar appearance. Lungs and pleura:
There is congenital pulmonary airway malformation involving the left
upper lobe with abnormal decreased lung attenuation in the left upper
lobe apical and anterior segments.  There is cystic dilatation of the
central airways involving the left upper lobe apical and anterior
segments without discernible connection to the tracheobronchial tree.  
The vascular supply of the left upper lobe apical and anterior segments
arises from the left main pulmonary artery.  The lingula has a normal
bronchoalveolar appearance.
1 Responses
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15695260 tn?1549593113
Hello and welcome to the forum. Thanks for your question. We do indeed recommend further follow up. Normally, this anomaly is detected at birth. To reach adulthood as asymptomatic seems to be rare in the literature. You should follow up with your primary care doctor but suspect you will be sent to a pulmonologist. The positive news is that since you've reached this age with no symptoms, the severity may be very low. Leading to a positive prognosis. When are you following up with your primary care doctor?
Helpful - 0
1 Comments
I did call my pcp and am awaiting a call back. The information I have seen mostly suggests surgery to remove-is This common? Thanks!
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