Aa
A
A
A
Close
STDs / STIs Community
39k Members
Avatar universal

AM I DYING???

A couple of weeks back I had unprotected oral sex, but immediately afterwards the guy and I drunk a Blue Powerade (those drinks irritate my throat). I started to feel as if I had to cough with chest tightness the following week after sex. Assuming I was getting sick I started taking Mucinex, Amoxicillin, Theraflu, Zyrtec, I was never consistent with taking the medicine only took them once or twice and then on to the next. I do believe I confused my body which raised my body temperature to 98.9 (a physician over the phone said that was not a fever). By the guy and I being in all types of positions I pulled a muscle in my chest because the feeling of having to cough went away. After going a week without taking anything I don’t feel lousy and body temperature is normal, however my eyes feel tired and I have slight nasal drainage plus I feel as if phlegm wants to come up. Does this sound like I’m dying ? Or that I have something incurable? I’ve been sneezing, no coughing, no fever, I’m stressing though.
1 Responses
207091 tn?1337713093
COMMUNITY LEADER
Honestly, it sounds like allergies or that you've been in dry air (like air conditioning or something).

98.9 is not a fever - that's within a normal range.

There is no STD that would make you feel this way, and no STD that you can get from oral sex is fatal.

Unfortunately, since you took Amoxicillin unnecessarily, it could mess up any testing you want to do. (Never take antibiotics without being told to by a doctor - this is how resistance develops.)

Did you give or receive oral, or both?

4 Comments
Both.
And thank you for responding =*)
You're welcome.

I'm going to tell you what STDs you're at risk for, but I need you to remain calm. Like, really calm. None of this would give you the symptoms you are experiencing, but certainly anxiety can cause some of them.

So receiving unprotected oral sex puts you at risk for syphilis, genital herpes type 1, gonorrhea and NGU.

Syphilis isn't that common, and your partner would have had to have a sore in their mouth to transmit it. You wouldn't see symptoms of this for 10-90 days, but the average is 21 days, and you'd get a sore called a chancre. This doesn't cause burning, pain, discharge, etc. You can test for this at 6 weeks. If you get symptoms, but test negative at 6 weeks, test again at 90 days.

If you don't already have herpes type 1 (think oral sores, like cold sores but not canker sores), then you could get genital herpes type 1 from receiving oral sex. This can happen even if the person performing oral doesn't have a sore, but it's more likely if they do. The time from infection to symptoms is usually 2-12 days, but the average is 4 days. You can test for this now, and then again at 4 months to make sure you don't have it. If you test positive now, it's a pre-existing infection that you had before this encounter. About half the adult population has this, and 90% don’t know it.

You'd see symptoms of gonorrhea at about 2-5 days, and this would usually be a discharge, burning, etc. Some people don't get symptoms. You can test for this as early as 3 days, but 5 days is better. You can have a urine test or a swab test.

NGU is an infection in the urethra that is caused by anything other than gonorrhea (nongonococcal urethritis urethritis, sometimes called NSU, for non-specific). This can be caused by normal mouth bacteria entering the urethra, and the symptoms and testing times are the same as gonorrhea.

Giving oral sex to someone with a penis puts you at risk for oral gonorrhea and syphilis. As I said above, syphilis isn't that common, and your partner would have had to have a sore that your mouth came into contact with to transmit it.

All of the time frames are the same for testing and symptoms appearing.

Oral gonorrhea doesn't usually have symptoms, but if you got them, it would be a sore, red throat, maybe a fever, maybe swollen glands. If you get symptoms, they usually appear within 7-21 days. You can test for this in the same time as above.

There is a risk here, but oral sex is lower risk than intercourse.

None of this is fatal, and with the exception of herpes, it is all easily cured with antibiotics.

Are we calm?
Yes we are, thank you dearly...
Have an Answer?
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Here are 16 facts you need to know to protect yourself from contracting or spreading a sexually transmitted disease.
How do you keep things safer between the sheets? We explore your options.
Can HIV be transmitted through this sexual activity? Dr. Jose Gonzalez-Garcia answers this commonly-asked question.
A breakthrough study discovers how to reduce risk of HIV transmission by 95 percent.
Dr. Jose Gonzalez-Garcia provides insight to the most commonly asked question about the transfer of HIV between partners.
The warning signs of HIV may not be what you think. Our HIV and STD expert Sean Cummings reports in-depth on the HIV "Triad" and other early symptoms of this disease.