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Can anyone help read my ultrasound results?

I had an ultrasound done on my thyroid today due to a lump/nodule I found. Here are the result and was just wondering if anyone could help my understand them a little better.

FINDINGS:

RIGHT LOBE: Measures 1.0 x 3.3 x 1.5 cm and demonstrates homogeneous echotexture with
normal vascularity. There is a cystic nodule at the junction of the right lobe and
isthmus with minimal internal echoes and no internal vascularity measuring 7 x 4 x 5 mm.

LEFT LOBE: Measures 1.1 x 3.3 x 1.1 cm and demonstrates homogeneous echotexture with
normal vascularity. No nodules identified.

ISTHMUS: Measures 2.2 mm in thickness and demonstrates normal parenchymal echogenicity.

IMPRESSION:
1. Right lobe thyroid cystic nodule measuring 7 x 4 x 5 mm
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Avatar universal
It looks like you have one small cystic thyroid nodule, otherwise your thyroid looks healthy.  Your nodule/cyst is small (less than 1 cm in any dimension), so it is very unlikely they will do anything further at this point other than monitor the nodule by ultrasound (once a year or perhaps less frequently).

If it is entirely cystic, it is most likely benign.  Some fluid filled cysts have solid components, which increases the risk of cancer, but according to your ultrasound, minimal internal echoes and no internal vascularity sounds like it is cystic with no solid components.  (And, even if it had solid components, most thyroid nodules are not cancerous.)

Sometimes cysts can change is size or cause discomfort, otherwise, they are usually left alone.

Good luck, and I hope this helps.
Helpful - 0
3 Comments
Thank you for commenting. My mother had to have her thyroid removed around 30 years ago because she had precancerous cells. So I am super worried that it could have been cancerous. I also had labs drawn yesterday too, to test my thyroid levels and several others things. Fingers crossing and lots of prayers its better news than what is going through my mind!
*crossed
Good luck!  Thyroid problems do run in families, but just because one family member has an issue  doesn't mean everyone will.  My grandmother had her thyroid removed at age 47 (we think it was cancer, but she didn't like to share bad health information).

I have Hashimoto's, and ended up with a multinodular goiter and three cancerous nodules so I had my thyroid removed in 2018 (age 37/38 - we did it in two surgeries because we weren't sure it was cancer until it was removed).

From my grandmother's side, I have an aunt who has thyroid nodules but all her test come back benign, and I also have an aunt, a mother, two sisters, a brother, one female cousin and three male cousins, and none of them have any thyroid issues.

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