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Question about hypothalamus and pituitary disorders

So I'm figuring out that my whole problem may be that my hypothalamus and pituitary glands have never worked since I was a child. Could this be the reason I'm not feeling any better on thyroid meds? Do you need to replace the hormones for the hypothalamus in order for it to respond to thyroid meds? I'm just so confused as to why I have felt worse ever since I started taking thyroid meds.  I fit all the profiles for hypothalamus and pituitary disorders, and since they affect the kidneys, it explains why I'm always thirsty and have to pee 2-3 times an hour. I don't have diabetes either.

This past month I started increasing my T3 thinking it would help my brain fog, but I"m feeling worse now and think I have screwed up my adrenals even more.
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649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
The entire hypothalamus/pituitary/thyroid axis must work properly in order for you to feel well.

You stated in another post that you have hypopituitarism; is this a definite diagnosis, based on both symptoms and testing?  If so, what tests have been done and what were the results, with reference ranges?
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Avatar universal
I don't have labs in front of me, but I've had hormone testing and my estrogen, progesterone, testosterone and growth hormones were all very low. I've also had an MRI that showed my pituitary gland was concave shaped, which my doc said is abnormal. I also never started a period and had to be put on hormones at 17 to start. I also was diagnosed with osteoporosis at 35. Growth hormones are made in the hypothalamus.
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1756321 tn?1547095325
Antidiuretic hormone (ADH or vasopressin) is a hormone produced by the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior pituitary gland.  ADH deficiency is known as diabetes insipidus.  Symptoms are frequent thirst and urination. Treatment is desmopressin (synthetic replacement for vasopressin) - taken 2 to 3 times a day.

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Avatar universal
How do you find out if you're ADH deficient? Is that a blood or urine test?
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1756321 tn?1547095325
I should add i was talking about hypothalamic (central) diabetes insipidus which is a deficiency of ADH hormone from the posterior pituitary.  Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is where the kidney is unable to respond to antidiuretic hormone.

The best test for diabetes insipidus is a water deprivation test.  Urine production, blood electrolyte levels, and weight are measured regularly for a period of about 12 hours, during which you are not allowed to drink.  At the end of 12 hours (or sooner if your blood pressure falls or heart rate increases or you lose more than 5% of your body weight) the doctor stops the test and injects ADH hormone.

The diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus is confirmed when excessive urination stops, urine becomes more concentrated, blood pressure rises, and your heart beats more normally in response to ADH hormone.

The diagnosis of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is made when excessive urination continues, urine remains dilute, blood pressure and heart rate do not change in response to ADH hormone.
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Avatar universal
Oh my! There's no way I could go 12 hours without drinking anything. Even after sleeping 7-8 hours I have to drink water when I wake up. I get dehydrated very easily and if I go too long without water, I get really dizzy and lightheaded and feel like I'm going to black out. I don't have to pee a lot when I don't drink water, but after I do drink even a tiny bit of water, I have to go very soon after. Most people can hold their water for at least a couple hours. I can't even go 30 minutes after I drink something.
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649848 tn?1534633700
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1756321 tn?1547095325
Queensland, Australia
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