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Reading a thyroid panel test?

I received my comprehensive thyroid panel test today but dont know how to read it. All of my numbers are normal except for Free T3 Uptake, it was low. All the other numbers were in normal range, but some were on the lower end of normal like the TSH, Free T4 number. Does this mean anything?

Not sure if it matters but i fasted prior to my lab test.
2 Responses
Avatar universal
Hi,
You need to add your lab results including the ranges or no one will be able to help.

For example : TSH 3.0 (1.0 - 10) same for all of your other results
4 Comments
Hello, these are my results

Thyroxine: 8.0. (Range 4.5 - 12)

T3 Uptake: 22 (Range 24 - 29)

Free Thyroxine Index: 1.8 (Range 1.2 - 4.9)

T4, Free: 0.96 (Range 0.82 - 1.77)

T3: 137 (Range 71 - 180)

TSH: 1.910 (Range 0.450 - 4.50)

TPO Antibodies: 14 (Range 0 - 34)

T3 Free: 3.0 (Range 2.0 - 4.4)
Are you on thyroid meds, if so how much?
Are you currently on thyroid meds? If so how much
I dont take thyroid meds. I have not been diagnosed yet, thats why i took the test. But i cant understand the results
Avatar universal
My results:
Thyroxine: 8.0. (Range 4.5 - 12)

T3 Uptake: 22 (Range 24 - 29)

Free Thyroxine Index: 1.8 (Range 1.2 - 4.9)

T4, Free: 0.96 (Range 0.82 - 1.77)

T3: 137 (Range 71 - 180)

TSH: 1.910 (Range 0.450 - 4.50)

TPO Antibodies: 14 (Range 0 - 34)

T3 Free: 3.0 (Range 2.0 - 4.4)
5 Comments
Your doctor ordered some obsolete and/or irrelevant tests... Those are the T3 uptake and Free thyroxine Index are obsolete and don't really tell anything.  The T4 and T3 tests are Total T4 and Total T3, which are unnecessary tests as they show both Free and bound amounts of hormones when we're concerned with the Free amounts which are the ones actually  used by the body.  

The results that are needed for a diagnosis are the Free T4, Free T3 and TSH tests, along with the Antibodies.   Most important are the Free T4 and Free T3.

In order for most of us to feel our best, we need to have Free T4 at about the mid-range point (yours is only at 14% of its range).  We also need Free T3 in the upper half to upper third of its range (yours is at 42% range).  Your levels indicate hypothyroidism...

Your antibody tests are lower than the reference ranges, indicating that you don't have Hashimoto's, but there's another antibody test that needs to be done because it's also a marker for Hashimoto's.  That test is Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb).  

With your actual thyroid hormone levels being as low in the ranges as they are, we'd expect your TSH to be higher than it is, since TSH, typically rises as thyroid hormone levels decline.  Because, both your TSH and thyroid levels are low, we'd have to suspect Central (or Secondary) hypothyroidism, which means that your thyroid works fine, there's something wrong with the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus so there's not enough TSH to stimulate the thyroid adequately.

Whatever the cause of hypothyroidism, it must treated with replacement medication.  The problem we see quite often is that Central hypothyroidism gets missed because doctors only look at the TSH, which in your case is what we'd consider "pristine".  If you doctor isn't looking at the Free T4 and Free T3, you might be misdiagnosed.  If you're told that your TSH is good and you have no problems, you should talk to your doctor about Central hypothyroidism.

What prompted all these tests?  Do you have symptoms of a thyroid disorder?  If so, what are your symptoms?

Hello, my whole life i've struggled with weight no matter what I do, i just gain weight. I get fatigue, irritable, tremors in fingers, vertigo, anxiety, sometimes weather sensitivity. I can do very well for a few months, then struggle for the next few. Its off and on.
Your symptoms are those we often see with hypothyroidism, though tremors are most often associated with hyperthyroidism.   Because your symptoms are "on again/off again", it's possible that you do have Hashimoto's, which, in early stages, often presents with symptoms that alternate between hypo and hyper or normal.  

Is it safe to assume that your endo did not order Free T4 and Free T3 tests since you didn't post those results?  

Weight is often a thyroid issue, but can also be caused by excess cortisol or insulin resistance.  When the thyroid isn't working properly, the adrenals often kick in to help take up the slack caused by inadequate thyroid hormones.  Cortisol is also produced in times of high stress.  

Insulin resistance happens with your body isn't using insulin properly.  Insulin is often known as "the fat storage" hormone because it shuttles blood glucose that isn't used for immediate energy into fat cells to save for later use.  For many of us, that excess fat is never used.  Have you had any tests for diabetes, such as blood glucose, insulin, A1c, etc?  
Yes i've had blood glucose tests, and the normal blood test done (cbc, wbc?) A few times, and they all came back normal. The only abnormal test i ever had was Vitamin D, it was extremely low at 4.
You can have "normal" blood glucose levels and still have insulin resistance.  That just means the cells of your body may not be using insulin/glucose properly.   Diet changes can often indicate whether insulin is being used properly... sticking with a low glycemic diet often helps one lose weight.
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