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7729616 tn?1393795492

Self-medicating

Hi I've posted on here before. Is it a good idea to self-medicate or ought I let my doctor know beforehand? I am currently on 100mcg T4 but I feel no better at all. Doctor will not increase my medication themselves as they have said my results are normal.

Thanks.
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7729616 tn?1393795492
Thanks for your reply.

I've already spoken to my doctor about being put on T3 - I even went armed with my test results. Her response was that prescribing T3 wasn't her field and it was something only the endocrinologist should prescribe.

I do have a book written by the late Dr Gordon Skinner and it clearly states that although thyroxine is more commonly prescribed by doctors here in the UK, liothyronine is more efficient. Is it worth taking this book along to my appointment? I am quite determined to change doctors at present because of how frustrated I am with my current one.

My endocrinologist keeps moving my appointment further and further away. In fact I have that little faith in them keeping my appointment the date it is now that I'm expecting another letter from them to say they have changed it, yet again.

I'm located in Bristol, South West United Kingdom.
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Avatar universal
Being in the UK poses special problems for getting proper treatment for hypothyroidism, due to the policies of the NHS.  One of our members with the same experience who was finally able to get the treatment needed, described her experience this way.

"What I have learned from my experience is that you have to go to the Dr's office and TELL THEM WHAT YOU WANT and to go backed up with knowledge.  You have to tell them that you have done your reading and looked into your condition and care about the long-term treatment of your health and thyroid.  If you fight for what you want, you will eventually find someone that is happy to go along with your wishes.  But we all have to take charge of our own health, right?"  

If even that fails, then there is always going private.  I know of several good thyroid doctors in the London area.  Where are you located?
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7729616 tn?1393795492
Thanks for your reply.

Yes, I have self-medicated in the past but stopped when I had hyper symptoms.

My doctor won't prescribe me T3 but because my lab results are normal despite me feeling so bad they will not retest my thyroid function again until another 6 months.

I've already tried fighting for FT3 testing in the past as well as fighting for FT3 medication by going as far as to present my doctor with the blood test results and saying: "would you agree that my FT3 is low?" and her response was "everything else looks normal. I know nothing about T3." And the conversation was left at that.

I'm now looking to change doctors as this is now frustrating me to no end.
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7729616 tn?1393795492
Thanks for your reply.

Lab results

TSH: 1.87 (0.2-4.2)
FT4: 16.6 (10-22)
FT3: 4 (3.1-6.8)
Anti-TPO: 33.5 (0-34)
Anti-TG: 103.5 (0-115)
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Avatar universal
A lot of us probably have self medicated at one point or another. Before I did, I got my PCP to run FT4 and FT3 tests. He wouldn't increase my dose, since I was seeing an endo, but he was willing to prescribe me cytomel. Anyway, with the results, I was able to confirm that they were low enough that I could take 75mcg with 25mcg (100 mcg) but after 4 weeks I ran out and since I didnt feel a difference, took 88mcg with 25 (113 mcg). The other option was going back to the useless 88, which tests proved inadequate. After 4 more weeks, I had blood drawn at a different endo who seems to know what he's doing. It's been 9 days though, and no results. But I feel no change either.

I guess the important thing is to make sure you aren't experiencing hyper symptoms, and fight for FT4 and FT3 testing, preferably before self medicating.
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Avatar universal
Please post your thyroid related test results and reference ranges shown on the lab report.  
Helpful - 0
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