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Understanding Test Results

Just trying to understand what my thyroid test results mean.
TSH: 0.42mlU/l (2 months before was 0.78)
Free T4: 9.8 pmol/L (was 12.4 before)
Free T3: 4.6 pmol/L (was 4.1 before)
Have been experiencing hypothyroid symptoms for past 1-2 years, had left hemithyroidectomy November 2013 after 4.8cm nodule found. Been on Armour thyroid tablets for the past 4 months but not feeling any changes!
Any help understanding the results would be greatly appreciated!
4 Responses
Avatar universal
Please post the reference ranges for your tests results, as shown on the lab report.   When were these tests done?  What dosage of Armour?  Have you been tested for Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin?  If so, please post those, with ranges also.  What symptoms do you have?  
Avatar universal
Hi!
reference ranges are 0.4-3.5 for TSH
9-20 for free T4 and 4-6.5 for free T3. tests were last done on the 17th of July at 8am and were fasting.
Ferretin levels are on 5 (reference range 20+) and was last tested on same blood test as thyroid. B12 is low and on supplement for that too, and Vitamin D is normal.
Symptoms are: sudden and random weight gain (2kg-3kg overnight every month or so), extreme fatigue, poor concentration, anxiety, depression, elevated sensitivity to the cold (really cold hands and feet), very dry skin, hair loss and change, digestion issues (extreme constipation and retention), irregular menstrual cycles, cholesterol has jumped up (i'm 21 and have a cholesterol level of 5 which is borderline elevated- lab levels are 5.3 and above) etc. I had a 4.8cm benign nodule removed nov last year (had grown from 2.5cm in june that year)
Not sure how much my dosage is for Armour, I take one tablet upon waking every morning and have been on it since april this year.
Thanks
Avatar universal
Oh, and the previous blood test for thyroid was 2 months before the last (May)
Avatar universal
When it comes to thyroid tests, just being within the so-called "normal" range is frequently inadequate.  Due to the erroneous method used to establish range, they are far too broad.  Many of our members say that symptom relief required free T3 in the upper third of its range and Free T4 around the middle of its range or slightly higher.   So you need to get your doctor to start raising your dose of Armour gradually, as necessary to relieve hypo symptoms.

In addition, ferritin, B12 and Vitamin D are very important for hypo patients.  I am not familiar with the range you listed for ferritin, but I expect that your ferritin should be around the middle of the range, so you need to supplement for that.  Sounds like you need to supplement more for B12, since that is best when in the upper part of its range.  D also needs to be around the middle of its range.

A good thyroid doctor will treat a hypo patient clinically by testing and adjusting Free T3 and Free T4 as necessary to relieve symptoms, without being constrained by resultant TSH levels.  You can get some good insight into clinical treatment from this letter written by a good thyroid doctor for patients that he sometimes consults with after initial tests and evaluation.  The letter is then sent to the participating doctor of the patient to help guide treatment.  In the letter, please note the statement, "the ultimate
criterion for dose adjustment must always be the clinical response of the patient."

http://hormonerestoration.com/files/ThyroidPMD.pdf


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