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Newborn with a broken collar bone and paralyzed vocal cord...any relation or can anyone relate to either?

My dd was in the NICU for a week.
She has a paralyzed vocal cord and broken collar bone.

Could the collar bone have caused the vocal cord to become inflamed or do you think they are not related at all...the docs are saying they are prob. not related...but wanted to know if anyone has heard of this.

Her voice does seem to get stronger as time goes on...but does not give the 'normal' baby cry....

any advice?
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Avatar universal
You told us that her thyroid was displaced so that has more relation to the paralyzed vocal fold than the broken collar bone.  It sounds like she had some kind of a trauma to her neck or chest region as she was coming out during birthing process (I'm assuming it was vaginal).    Does her voice sound like it's doubled (almost like echoing) or it's just weak?  A paralyzed vocal fold will cause her aspirate the food (meaning, it goes down her lungs rather than food pipe).  The good news is that it's fixable.  I'm not diagnosing her just yet as I don't know the whole history behind all this.  I can't tell you what the drs will choose to do about this as I don't know exactly what caused the paralysis.  Hang in there.  Let us know what the drs tell you.
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Avatar universal
Yes, it was a vaginal delivery.
She was aspirating and we are thickening my breast milk...and she has not had any episodes since. She had a swallow study to determine if she was aspirating.
her voice is just weak...but IS getting stronger. nothing like the high pitch baby cry...more of a grunt.
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Avatar universal
It's great that her cry is getting stronger.  I hope little Allison feels better soon and mommy/daddy can rest easy (well, as easy as you can rest with two kiddies in the house).  I'm about to experience having a toddler and a newborn myself soon and I'm getting nervous!!  Again, good luck :)
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Avatar universal
I don't think they are related either! Like I said before, my little one had a broken collarbone at birth. There's really nothing you can do about that except keep her comfy and not jostle that side. It should heal within 2-4 weeks.

My DD developed torticollis which we believe was related to her broken collarbone. It is a tightness of the muscles in the neck. I noticed my daughter always had her head turned to one side and she would not turn her neck. I told my doctor right away, she diagnosed it, we went to physical therapy about 3 times and it is corrected through little strengthening and stretching exercises, so definitely be on the look for that. It is a lot easier to treat early on.

Children who have untreated torticollis walk around with their heads bent down to their shoulders (ear-to-shoulder) and cannot fully turn their necks to the sides. They have to have a lot more physical therapy than we did.

Not that this WILL happen, not trying to scare you! I just want you to be informed and it isn't anything scary or even life-threatening.

BTW, I battled a lot of guilt over her broken clavicle, blamed myself that it happened. Just know there wasn't anything you did and that your daughter is going to be fine! Babies can handle quite a lot and actually heal better and faster as infants since their bones are completely formed yet.
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Avatar universal
Thanks for the advice about the collar bone..I have never heard of that and will talk to my doc about it when I take her on Monday.
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193609 tn?1292180293
My son also had torticollis and his has also resolved through physical therapy, but left untreated for too long can make it harder to reverse.
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