Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

2 weeks late period

Hello,

I'm 19 years old. I have hypothyroidism treated w/ desiccated thyroid extract. I also have very low progesterone issues (with unknown cause but treated w/ progestin cream).

I keep track of my period to make sure it's regular. However, this month's period has not started and it's 2 week overdue. I think the common response is pregnancy, but that is improbable since I've NEVER had sexual intercourse of any sort.
I DID forget a few dosages of my thyroid meds and progesterone which I think can mess up my hormonal balances.

Some of the symptoms I've been experiencing:
IBS (cramping, gas, constipation)
Odd fullness and pain (gas?) in lower stomach/pelvic area.
Common hypo symptoms (tiredness, hair loss, pale skin, etc)
Low appetite/ quickly full
Occasional pain in pelvic area, hips and low back.
Some vaginal discharge.
Slight weight loss.
*NO* nausea.
*NO* dizziness
*NO* spotting
*NO* breast tenderness or changes

I have a feeling it may just be my hormones being out of whack due to missing my medication on a couple occasions. However, if anyone has a similar experience or any questions, please feel free to respond!  


  
3 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
134578 tn?1614729226
COMMUNITY LEADER
If you have low progesterone, it's possible that the missing doses just put you over the edge into the "not enough" category. To have a period, you need to have no progesterone for some time in the month, then have about 12 days of progesterone, and then STOP the progesterone. Something about that cycle (having it and then it halting) brings on a period. If your progesterone was low in the first place, there might not have been enough of a signal to your body of the change from having it to not having it.

You might see if you can find a hormone specialist (ask your ob/gyn to recommend someone) who understands the interaction of thyroid issues and progesterone.
Helpful - 0
3 Comments
Thanks. That's interesting biology. I'll talk to my doctor when I see her soon. Thanks again. :) I'm going to be more vigilant on my meds now.
I'm surprised she doesn't have you on a progesterone capsule 12 days a month, myself. If you can, see if you can check around to find someone who knows more about female hormones. The thyroid issue would have to be figured into the mix, of course. I found my hormone doc by asking at the compounding pharmacy who did my hormones when I was doing IVF, and they knew right away who in my city to go see.
She originally had me on a progesterone pill but she decided to switch to a topically applied cream on days 15-28. My doctor is a holistic Dr who my mom wants me to go to but sometimes I feel like she just reads my charts then rx's a bunch of different supplements without actually looking closer at it all.
134578 tn?1614729226
COMMUNITY LEADER
Do you mean a pill you eat or a pill (capsule) you use as a vaginal suppository? I don't think much of the creams, the dose is to iffy. But a capsule (essentially a gelatin capsule with powder in it) gives a solid and consistent dose. If you did those days 15-28, you should get enough progesterone.
Helpful - 0
3 Comments
An oral pill. And I did mention I missed a couple doses of the cream (which I don't intend on doing again).
I don't have anything against holistic doctors who offer supplements, but I do have a problem with any doctor who gives cursory exams and/or seems to be uninterested in diagnosis. See a different doctor, and get your hormones tested. Either an ob/gyn or a specialist like an endocrinologist.
I would also recommend finding a doctor who has you use the progesterone capsule as a vaginal suppository. It just seems like a lot is getting lost in the delivery method, the way you have been doing it.
973741 tn?1342342773
COMMUNITY LEADER
I personally would not especially at your age self treat or not go to an MD.  I also don't have anything against holistic doctors if they are medically trained at a major university. BUT, you are  young and you are manipulating hormones and having thyroid issues at a YOUNG age.  Sometimes over manipulation can create situations on its own and you end up on medications for a life time. I personally would rather not be.  And I will tell you that hormonal issues and thyroid issues sometimes iron themselves out.  I'm an example of that. I had a slow thyroid and produced too much estrogen in my 20's.  Caused me to have a very long cycle (period every 3 to 4 months) and other symptoms.  I was waiting for my appointment with an endocrinologist.  And during that time before the appointment, my issues resolved.  Sort of out of nowhere.  I have not had an issue with my thyroid since.  Nor have I had any hormonal issues until recently (20 some years later and related to getting older and the change and all that).  I had two kids.  I've had a regular period for a couple of decades now.  So,  just keep that in mind.  I WAS working with my ob/gyn the whole time during my year and a half of hormonal imbalance and hypothyroidism.  I highly recommend you find a good one and work with them as well.

that you are late is pretty common with hypothyroidism.  Perhaps the regime you've got for yourself isn't handling things quite as well.  OR, you are experiencing what happens to everyone which is that other things interfere with our cycle too.  Like stress, changes in routine, illness, weight gain or loss, etc.  Again, especially at your age, thyroid issues can resolve and to avoid life time needs of hormones or thyroid meds would be great.  So, consider that.  Sometimes we end up doing too much. You aren't in the stage of worrying about fertility or getting pregnant.  That's just my opinion. If you end up needing thyroid medication, then so be it.  And that in itself can straighten out any and all hormonal issues. They are interrelated. But it doesn't sound like you are on true medication for that at this point and just a supplement.  

It sounds complicated.   If you are in college, perhaps you can go to the clinic at your college for a second opinion about what you are currently using med or supplement wise.  ?
Helpful - 0
3 Comments
Thanks. Have been under a lot of stress lately  - finals, learning to drive, etc. I actually would go see a legit MD endocrinologist but unfortunately I'm restricted by whoever my mom chooses. :( I've only been treated for thyroid because it severely affected my school performance (15-17 yrs old, C's and Bs vs 18-19 yrs old, A+)

I'm transferring in the fall to a residential college so I'll definitely visit the clinic then. I actually am on true medication, which is T3 and T4 combined vs levothyroxine which is only T4.
Oh, okay.  I for some reason thought you were on a supplement.  Wow, you are indeed pretty young to be on full medication but hey, if it helps, so be it, right?!  You were having cognitive difficulties with it in terms of maintaining your grades? I do think it will be best for you to see an ob/gyn.  Be careful of getting into too much manipulation of hormones other than say "the pill" at this stage of your life.  And again, some issues like this can straighten out naturally.  Anyway, stay in touch and let us know how it goes!
Sure. Thanks for your help.
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Women's Health Community

Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
STDs can't be transmitted by casual contact, like hugging or touching.
Syphilis is an STD that is transmitted by oral, genital and anal sex.
Normal vaginal discharge varies in color, smell, texture and amount.
Bumps in the genital area might be STDs, but are usually not serious.
Chlamydia, an STI, often has no symptoms, but must be treated.
From skin changes to weight loss to unusual bleeding, here are 15 cancer warning signs that women tend to ignore.