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MAOI Side Effects that can go unnoticed...

Jul 23, 2009 - 0 comments
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MAOI

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Bipolar Depression

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major depressive disorder

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seratonin syndrome



I learned the VERY hard way and suffered Seratonin Syndrome a few weeks back...maybe this can help others from taking these warnings so lightly and mixing OTC drugs with the brain meds...
(I use Parnate)

Side effects of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)

All antidepressants can cause side effects. Your doctor can help you find the drug that suits you best.

Treatment with an antidepressant might make you think more about suicide, especially when you first start taking it.
     Source:
U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Antidepressant use in children, adolescents and adults.
May 2007. Available at http://www.fda.gov/cder/drug/antidepressants/default.htm (accessed on 24 March 2009).
      1 Young people are most at risk, especially anyone under 18.

A big problem with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as phenelzine (Nardil) and tranylcypromine (Parnate), is that they react with lots of other medications, foods and alcoholic drinks.

If you take an MAOI, eating foods containing the natural chemical tyramine (such as aged cheese) can dangerously raise your
     blood pressure
Blood pressure is the amount of force exerted by the blood on the walls of the vessels that carry it. You can think of it like the water pressure in your home: the more pressure you have, the faster and more forcefully the water flows out of the shower. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (written as mm Hg). When your blood pressure is taken, the measurement is given as two numbers, for example 120/80 mm Hg. The first, higher, number is called the systolic pressure, and the second, lower, number is the diastolic pressure. The systolic number is the highest pressure that occurs while the heart is pushing blood into the arteries. The diastolic number is the lowest pressure that happens when the heart is relaxing and is not pushing the blood.       blood pressure.      Source:
British National Formulary.
Monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).
Section 4.3.2. British Medical Association and Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. Also available at http://bnf.org (accessed 24 March 2009).
      2 The first sign of very high blood pressure is usually a throbbing headache. If this happens, see your doctor right away. People taking these drugs have to be careful about what they eat.

If you take an MAOI, you should avoid:
     Source:
British National Formulary.
Monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).
Section 4.3.2. British Medical Association and Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. Also available at http://bnf.org (accessed 24 March 2009).
      2


Meat extracts or yeast extracts
Broad beans, especially the pods
Pickled herring
Cough, cold and flu remedies containing a decongestant
Alcoholic drinks (even low-alcohol drinks such as non-alcoholic beer)
Aged cheeses (such as cheddar, Parmesan, blue)
Smoked or pickled meat, poultry or fish
Fermented sausage (such as bologna, pepperoni, salami)
Sauerkraut
Overripe fruit
Large amounts of coffee, tea, cola, chocolate or other items containing caffeine.
Make sure to ask your doctor for a full list of foods, drinks and medications to avoid.

MAOIs also react dangerously with most other antidepressants.
     Source:
British National Formulary.
Monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).
Section 4.3.2. British Medical Association and Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. Also available at http://bnf.org (accessed 24 March 2009).
      2 The combination of tranylcypromine (Parnate) with clomipramine (Anafranil) is particularly dangerous.      Source:
British National Formulary.
Monoamine-oxidase inhibitors.
Section 4.3.2. September 2007. BNF 54. British Medical Association and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. Also available at http://bnf.org (accessed on 24 March 2009).
      3 Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant.

If you stop taking an MAOI, you should not start taking another antidepressant for two or three weeks.


Common side effects of MAOIs
In studies, the most common side effects reported by people taking MAOIs were:      Source:
Thase ME, Trivedi MH, Rush AJ.
MAOIs in the contemporary treatment of depression.
Neuropsychopharmacology. 1995; 12: 185-219.
      4


     low blood pressure
If your blood pressure is about 100/60 or less, your doctor may say that you have low blood pressure. Low blood pressure is usually not a problem unless it becomes too low to push blood to your brain and the rest of the body. If you have low blood pressure, you may sometimes feel dizzy when you stand up. To find out what these numbers mean, see blood pressure.       Low blood pressure, causing faintness
Dizziness
Blurred vision
Goose bumps
Difficulty sleeping
Trembling
Problems with sex, including being unable to have an orgasm.

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