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Whatever happened to Sex Education??

Jan 23, 2010 - 24 comments

I see on here more and more everyday it seems like with teens asking "Am I pregnant?" or "Could I be pregnant?" Part of the time the person hasn't even had sex and is scared b/c they fooled around and so on. I guess I can understand to some point, but honestly how do kids these days not know how they get p/g and when they can get p/g?? I've even seen on here where a girl used her stepdads towel and it was damp and she thought maybe he used it for something else and wanted to know if she could be p/g! I know it's not 100% the schools responsibility but honestly, when did it become easier just to hand out condoms or trust your daughter to take the pill and not truly educate them??? Is this why teen pregnancy has become so accepted in our society these days? I'm not here to criticize those who are in there teens and p/g, but where does responsibility of the parents and (**some** school/teacher) come into play??? I guess it just urkes me to see soooo much of this going on in the society these days and how widely accepted it is....I don't know, maybe it's just me. This is my opinion, so please don't criticize me for it!

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784382 tn?1376931040
by turkee23, Jan 23, 2010
not 100 % the school responsibility its the parents job to educate their childern, or sign the release that their child can be involved in the sexual education class..... i see the same post everyday ALL DAY. your right half of them say " im a virgin, but he fingered me...can i get prego?"...

i understand where u coming from...lots of women want to have babies and they cant, but these girls are popping them out and dont even know how they got prego, or if they even are.....

478429 tn?1265244387
by dnikki0928, Jan 23, 2010
Yes I agree it's not the schools responsibility - It is most def. the parents. However, I do think something does need to be taught in the schools in a seperate class...It seemed like once one girl got p/g at my high school (I graduated 6yrs ago), then a bunch of them thought it would be cool to get p/g and get the attention... We have one little boy and are soon expecting our little girl to arrive and I can't stand the though of them going into Jr. High and high school with I guess all this pressure and having school matest thinking this is all okay. Another thing I'm tired of are parents being best friends with their kids instead of parents! There is nothing wrong with being friends with your kids as long as it doesn't interfere with your role as the parent and not losing track of that!!! Sorry, this must be a hormonal vent of something lol!!! But it's true!!!

171768 tn?1324230099
by tiredbuthappy, Jan 23, 2010
I am a very firm believer in sex ed being offered in schools. My school did a GREAT job of educating me about birth control and how people get pregnant. And they did a great job in letting us know that birth control is not 100%. Honestly, it was this thorough education that helped me hesitate in having sex at a very young age. I hope that sex ed is still around when my girls get older. While I will talk to them about it (with a very strong emphasis on abstinence), i know that it would be very helpful if the info came from elsewhere as well. Is my daughter really going to sit there while I run through every birthcontrol option out there? If schools are not doing it then, then I will have her be educated by a gyn or similar professional. Plus, contraceptive methods change. I probably won't know all of the options myself when the time comes.

535822 tn?1443976780
by margypops, Jan 23, 2010
I also think it should be taught more than it is, but I also believe it is up to the Parents more, I didnt get involved in any discussions with my daughter and she did become pregnant early, I wish in hindsight I had been tougher on her and talked about it more ,this was quite a few years ago now , but I do see that if I had been more hands on instead of working hard running a business I could 'maybe' have been aware of what was happening ...so yes in the schools aswell but the buck does stops here when it comes to what you do at home ....

134578 tn?1614729226
by AnnieBrooke, Jan 23, 2010
What happened to sex education in schools, at least in my district, is that a group of people from a particular church protested and protested (saying it's the parent's responsibility, a fair enough point if parents would step up and provide the information to their kids, but they don't).  So the district couldn't afford the heat and the lawsuits, and they dumped sex education.  The district doesn't have any money anyway because the voters keep voting down the school levy, so they probably were kind of glad to be rid of the need to teach that particular class.  

13167 tn?1327194124
by RockRose, Jan 23, 2010
We had sex education in my high school - I'm now 50 - and the girls dutifully learned all the body parts and cycle information and could make A's on the tests but couldn't incorporate that knowledge into real life.

I knew a girl who thought babies grew within your stomach.  Like, your actual stomach where food is,  and the only way to deliver them was through C-section.  This was a mainstream girl in normal high school classes.

I knew a girl who thought you couldn't get pregnant on the first time you had sex.   When we all insisted yes you could,  she rolled her eyes and laughed at us like she knew more than we did,  and said "well,  he'd have to be REALLY big!"  I still don't know what that girl was thinking.

I knew a girl who thought it was amazing tampons worked because when you peed,  why didn't they just wash through.  She didn't realize her uretha and her vagina were two different things.  There was another girl who thought guys had a piston.  

This all came up in sophomore biology, after we'd all had freshman sex ed.  Of course,  I can fault the health/sex ed teacher some - she told us all that the prime time to get pregnant was in the couple days leading up to when you expected to get your period.  

That poor biology teacher.  He had to reteach everything.  




730826 tn?1317943334
by Lucey12, Jan 23, 2010
I think it should be mandatory in schools. I know in BC there was a class about sex for grade one students. They explained what sex is and you do it when you are in love and want to have a baby. HELLO? How many 6 years olds have a crush and want a baby... I know when I was little I want to have a baby. I was the youngest so that could be why. But I think parents should have a right at that age, to pull their kids out of that. Highschool however, it should be mandatory in. So many kids in elementary school and in highschool, were not allowed to go, yet their parents never taught them about it, they were Christian and didnt want their kids having sex so they pulled them out so they wouldnt learn about it.

The reason for these posted are because they are worried. They have probably heard about come case where someone got pregnant without sex so they think it will happen. When I was younger (elementary school age) I watched an episode of Roseanne where she was trying o get pregnant and wasnt having much luck. She said there was a time they just needed to share the same soap and she got pregnant. After that I would use body wash only.

134578 tn?1614729226
by AnnieBrooke, Jan 23, 2010
RockRose -- that's so hilarious.  Makes me glad my main sex-ed course was in college.  Too late for teaching sex-ed from a prevention-of-teenage-pregnancy point of view, of course, but at least the information was accurate.  Our biggest problem was a gal in the front row who kept shouting out answers.  When our professor said women can have more than one orgasm during a sexual encounter, she jumped up and down and volunteered (to our 63-person lecture hall) that she had "hundreds" of orgasms.  (Someone in the back row said "An auction!  An auction!")  



535822 tn?1443976780
by margypops, Jan 23, 2010
Ha Ha Lucy I never heard that one about the soap.....

478429 tn?1265244387
by dnikki0928, Jan 23, 2010
Well I'm glad people see my point of view! With all these government run programs and grants and such, why can't there be a fund for sex ed in at least jr. high when you can still (hmmm, how do I want to put this...) scare the sh*t of them so they won't have sex until way later on or at least be smart enough and educated enough to make an informed decision?! I think what brought all this on is my neighbors 16yr. old niece. She got p/g last year, stuff went down with baby daddy drama and well, she nor baby daddy has the baby. Well I found out she got p/g again this past Sept. but she lost it....!!!  

Some of the stories you ladies have shared about class mates and such - WOW is all I have to say!!!

Avatar universal
by RJ233, Jan 23, 2010
Sex education started in schools here more than 30 years ago. Problem was they didn't just explain the birds and the bees and information on prevention and disease, it went way beyond and above that. My children were young and in grade school at the time. The sex ed. started in kindergarden and through graduation. I went to the schools where the information was available for parents to see from the entire program. They had rooms and rooms of books packed, filling the rooms, starting in kindergarden. They had films that I viewed. I went to three different locations for viewing in the county, on 3 seperate occassions. It was mind boggling. I viewed one of the films for the age group between 14-16. It showed a girl the day after she had sex. Her thoughts, questions, what she did, and the answers, were given for the viewer. It told the girl, you decide. You don't have to listen to your parents or your Church, it is up to you to decide if you want to be sexually active. There were naked children in kindergarden books. It was not just a class, things were interwoven into such things as English and Literature classes. Setting up a picture such as making a life and death decision of a group of people, like a bomb shelter or a boat that could only hold so many people and one had to be left to die. They gave choices such as a child, pregnant woman, old preacher. Who would you chose to live and die. It taught there was no right and no wrong, involving any of their decisions regarding any of it. It was all left up to the child. This being instilled from kindergarden. By higher grades, it told them how to perform sex begining with fondling, including how to balance a budget in the same book. Abortion is used as an answer to your problem. Imbedding, the non-value of life. Sex with the same sex as them, was ok. (Not saying I have an agenda against gays). Masterbation was another thing taught. They missed nothing.

Upon going to the one preacher that was chosen, disagreed and then replaced by one that would back it, I found that if the county rejected it, they would lose federal funding, so they made sure it was passed. The preacher was well known in the county, thus they wanted his approval, though it didn't work. I even went to the school board as I felt they were going too far, but, it should be left up to the parent as a choice, not a mandate. All the information in three visits, was impossible to be viewed. It was to be a part of school and no way to keep any control on what the child was being taught, making it harder for the parent to instill values, or to teach them as they grew to the point of maturity in life. There was no right, no wrong, and it was pushed to close your ears to parents or church or any other source of guidence. They were offered clinical visits during school hours so parents were not aware of when or what their child was getting, with no regard to health issues. They were not marked absent for missed classes. Children could sign for medical records and get them, without parental knowledge, if the child happened to tell them they had health issues.

I had real concerns about this not just as a Christian, but as any parent. I know personally, how they over-ride the parent and the health of your child. I found out by a dr. that got medical record information requested by the child and refused treatment. On that basis, it could have caused death for the child, as there were many health issues and much medication involved. I knew nothing about it. The county would have gotten by had my child died as a result. It was not that I had not taught my children, and been open for them to come to me. When you drill any child's head to step over the parent's authority, or any other, leaving it up to a teen to decide, then teach them to deceive, with no guilt of any right or wrong, it is asking for trouble. If a parent wants someone to take charge over their child, then they ignore their responsibility, but, it does not give anyone the right to TAKE it from the parent that does. It may not change the outcome of what our children do, because they do have a mind of their own, but to feed defiance of authority can cause great harm. They won't only defy the parents, but every authority, teachers, police, any authoritive figure. That is a lot of the problems we face with young people right now. I had many conversations with my children about the things I saw, so as not to let them aid in destruction of a healthly mind. My daughter came home with a library book in the 4th grade that described a rape right down to bloody sheets. I had a heated discussion with her principal, my former teacher. I was embarrassed reading the information because it was so discriptive. Did it stop anything, no.

We wonder why our children are getting pregnant, killing parents, have no regard for authority, and do what they want. There is good reason. As I said, my children are grown, and that was many years ago. I hate to think just how far it has gone. I do know, that drs, back those many years ago, viewed films being shown and were suppose to speak after the films to the children, got up and walked out, because it was so degrading. I did my homework. So, it is not a matter of Christian belief, though we do have our guidelines, it is a matter of taking your child's mind and warping it. Feeding sex, just do it, and they will help, behind what you know, and cover it up. Now what is that to teach a child. Not all things are as good as it seems. It has been many years ago, but I will never forget it.

Sorry for taking up this space in your journel, but I felt, it was information you may want to be aware of.

203342 tn?1328737207
by April2, Jan 23, 2010
Wow, RJ. My kids went to private school for a long time but I didn't realize how bad the public schools had gotten until I let my daughter go to a public (charter but still public) school 3 years ago. I admit, I was very protected and naive growing up. My mother didn't even teach me about periods so I was a bit freaked out when I got it at the age of 12.
I tried to do better with my kids and did talk to them, more than once. My son one time found some porn at the age of 11, I think, and I was heartbroken but my husband and I sat down and talked to him for a couple of hours and went over everything, including that a girl can get pregnant and not be married (he didn't know that) and talked about homosexuality and everything. We shared our Christian beliefs that God meant for sex to be good and not perverted like the porn industry was doing.
We also talked to our daughter but you know what? There's a lot of peer pressure out there too. I was still pretty naive and didn't realize how prevalent it was out there. Kids are having sex and it's no big deal anymore. I talked to my daughter about that too and she assured us she wanted to wait for marriage. We believed her. I think she did mean it, too, but again, that peer pressure can be so strong, even stronger than what they've been taught and know better. I'm not making excuses because I can see where I made mistakes but my daughter won't even let me take all that on me (we've talked a lot about this) and has told me more than once that it's not my fault. She knew better but did it anyway. She has owned up to her own mistakes. She sees how I tried to protect her and tried to steer her in the right direction but she's the type of kid who's very strong willed and had to learn a lot the hard way. I never wanted that but I think at some point all kids rebel, even really good kids. I know our old pastor's daughter went down the wrong road for awhile and had sex and tried things but then straightened out her life and got back on track. I think it's gotten harder and harder for kids to stay on the straight and narrow and I commend any who can do it. I do think a lot do slip up and do things they know they probably shouldn't and regret it when they're older.

No, sex ed shouldn't be left up to the schools. It should be taught at home and reinforced over and over. Looking back, I see that it takes more than one or a few talks. You have to constantly talk to your kids and never presume anything. Don't ever think your kid wouldn't lie to you or go behind your back because even the best kids will try stuff at some point or another. It doesn't mean they're bad kids, just that they tend to allow themselves to be controlled by their emotions more than their logical mind as a teen. It's a wonder they ever make it to adulthood!
I just wish I had learned a lot more of this when my kids were still little. I learned so much of this too late.

I never tried to be a buddy to my kids. I did parent them the best I knew how, though I do see I made many mistakes. But I know they both tried stuff. I was naive enough to think if you eat dinner together most nights and go to their games and stay involved that they wouldn't stray. But like I said, sometimes they will still find a way. All we can hope is that they do remember their values and come back around to them.
I sure wouldn't want to be a teenager today. I feel sorry for them. They have so much more to deal with today than we did, I truly believe that.
Sorry I took up so much space here. :) I'll shut up now, lol.



1035252 tn?1427227833
by Ashelen, Jan 23, 2010
I agree 100% that it's the parents' responsibility to teach sex education and about protection...however, we've shown as a whole that we as parents are not stepping up to the plate. parents are responsible for their child's nutrition, and yet there's a HUGE child obesity rate in America. a lot of schools are stepping up and requiring more physical activity, as well as courses informing children about their nutritional choices.

after all, isn't sex education a form of knowledge, which we entrust to our schools? I think it needs to be comprehensively offered in school, because as much as parents SHOULD be responsible, apparently they ARE NOT, because the questions these children are asking are so bizarre and obvious uninformed that it hurts my heart that no one has talked to these babies about making babies!

i went to a private school and LITERALLY out of 1000 students, we had exactly 3 obese students the year I graduated. prek-12. We had had one teenage pregnancy, which ended in abortion, in the 13 years i attended that school. Granted, private schools are GENERALLY reserved for people with higher income, and therefore better nutritional/exercise habits, I came from one of the poorer families, and it was my school that informed me about good nutrition and staying active. it was also my school that did 100% of my sex education..my parents never had "the talk". the sex ed class was so comprehensive and informative that I chose to abstain until my 18th birthday when I met the man I became engaged to and later married (still married 7 1/2 years later :) ). I was afraid of STDs and pregnancy because they informed me of the odds, and it was ENTIRELY due to their methods that I stayed abstentious until I was an adult.

the other thing to consider about sex ed being in schools is that kids who are receiving information from home AND school are more like to feel that it's reinforced, and more likely to consider it. If ONLY the parents are talking, they might consider the information "parental" or "old-fashioned" and blow it off. conversely, if it comes only from the school it might be "uncool" or "authoritative". so it needs to be a balance of parents taking responsibility and the schools offering knowledge. a lot of parents cannot separate emotion or embarrassment from the topic and leave a lot of vital information out...a school, approaching it from an academic standpoint, can offer the information that parents are unwilling or unable to share.

Avatar universal
by RJ233, Jan 23, 2010
All kids have rebellious ages that they go through. We parent them and teach them, and listen to them (when we are trying to live up to our children's needs in a responsible manner. Teaching where babies come from and how they are made, and about diseases, were taught even in my health classes. I don't put trust in a complete over-haul from what I have seen, even so many years ago. Especially, telling teens, not to listen to parents or any other authority in their life. That feeds the rebellion to a greater level. It makes what we teach go out the window. I sat down with both my daughter and son (their dad was no help). I had a good book that explained the body of male and female, how it all works, so they would understand the functioning part. Then I discussed it all with them. Then, since I raised my children as Christians, I took the verses that dealt with the responsibilities that God provided. As they grew, then dated, I kept the door open in guidance and facts. It is up to the child as to what they do, as stated, they will find a way. They need to be fully aware of all circumstance that can come with sexual activity. Diseases are worse than ever and HIV is in schools. Pressure is worse than ever. We can steer them, guide them, inform them, and try to use methods to control situations they are subject to, but, in the end, they decide when they hit the circumstances. As parents, we know our children better than any teacher ever could, and in the end, if we don't open up to our children and not be embarrassed to teach our children to the best of our ability, then we failed on our part. I wanted my children to be taught the right way. I told them if the day came that they were going to be sexually active, I would not judge them, but would help with protection. I was taught nothing. It taught me a lot not knowing, what they should know. No one should teach our children to deceive us, especially the school. They care about pregnancy, though they give them the opportunity to over ride our authority. Conflict teachings only add to their confusion, and voids the problems they face from the actions. No matter what we do, they will still make the final decision, but at least, it will be with eyes wide open. That is all we can do.

If parents don't want to do that, as there are quite a few that let them learn on the street as they used to say, from other children that may know nothing. Those parents should opt to have a class of teaching in a normal period of time. It does not take kindergarten to graduation to teach about sexual activity and what can happen. It certainly is not the right of a school to go behind the parents back to clinics, knowing nothing about their health. Birth control has it's dangers, and should be treated as such. If a parent signs off to let the school teach them, then they should sign a paper allowing birth control means. The school is clear of responsibility of their health and it is the parents that are at fault. It can be done at the beginning of school each year,and if it is just for birth control, so the child does not have to face the parent at the time they do start. That way, all things are taken into consideration for the protection of the child.

134578 tn?1614729226
by AnnieBrooke, Jan 24, 2010
Ashelen, very well put.

730826 tn?1317943334
by Lucey12, Jan 24, 2010
I kind of think School is for teaching our kids, Parents are for guiding them. Obviously parents teach their kids many things but the majority of sex ed should be taught in schools. How awkward is it to have to explain sex to your kid, once you say that thats how babies are made, they know you do it, then its more of a personal question. When it comes to making sure your kids have easy access to protection, that is all up to the parents to make sure their kids can get it anytime. Ever since I was 11 when my sister had her baby as a teen, my mom told me regularly that I need to make sure Im on the pill if Im going to be with someone and that I just needed to go tot eh clinic to get it. I never even went to the clinic with my mom, (she kept at me to see if I was on it and I told her I already was) I knew how to get it thanks to her and did it on my own.

478429 tn?1265244387
by dnikki0928, Jan 24, 2010
I have to disagree - Yes parents are there to guide them, so why shouldn't we guide our children to make the right choices and educate them about sex and std's and so on? I find it a huge problem just to tell my kids - hey there's condoms in the medicince cabinet, make sure you take some tonight just in case...or hey, did you go back to the clinic this month and make sure you got your bcp's?? I just don't agree with that! One thing as a parent is you have to talk to your kids about akward stuff! If you find it akward, then maybe the subject is too mature for you - I don't know. I just completely disagree with that!

1035252 tn?1427227833
by Ashelen, Jan 24, 2010
Well but I think the bigger picture here is that every person's parenting style is different...which means that every child is being offered different levels of knowledge (in some cases none) and different levels of access to protection if they choose to be sexually active.... what we need to do is offer a baseline of information in the schools that allows a parent to reinforce it with good parenting at home, but offers an unemotional, academic, logical approach to sex and all the information that needs to be included.

let's face it..even parents don't always know everything about sex! there are a lot of ideas floating around the heads of people who are currently parents that are patently untrue, mostly because they've been disproved with time, or because the parent never learned the info in the first place. so assuming that every parent can guide their child comprehensively about such an important topic is probably an erroneous conclusion. i mean how many parents of current teenagers have approached the topic of STDs contracted through oral sex????

and i don't know about that, dnikki; you say that if you find the topic awkward to bring up with your child, it's because the topic is too mature? well how soon is TOO soon to offer sex education information to your children? you might think that your eleven-year-old daughter is too young, only to find out when you approach her at age thirteen that she's been active for two years and not protecting herself correctly. So I think that middle school-aged children need to be offered an introduction to protection methods, and then once they reach high school they should be offered a more comprehensive range of information about sex in general and all the information surrounding sexual activity, STDs, pregnancy, etc.

I really wish that parents would take charge here .... but I'm not sure it's fair to the children to assume that they will. when I was at the ER one time for spotting at 7wks pregnant and they told me that the urine test was positive, I responded with "I knew it would be, but thank you." and the nurse said "Thank god you said that. we had a 19-year-old come in the other day, and when we told her that she was pregnant she began crying hysterically and saying "how did this happen?!!!!!!????' " . they LITERALLY had to tell her how it happened!!!!!!!!!!

478429 tn?1265244387
by dnikki0928, Jan 24, 2010
Ash: No, I meant if the parent(s) finds it akward to bring up to their kids, then maybe the topic is too mature for the parent...I've stated in one of the above posts that it is definitely needed at the start of Jr. High... and I do agree with everything you have said - you have everything well put :-)

1035252 tn?1427227833
by Ashelen, Jan 24, 2010
LOL I totally see what you mean now that I re-read it. I'm so tired I think my eyes are crossing...my bad. I get what you mean now, and I totally agree. Some parents need to really cowboy up and do their job!

203342 tn?1328737207
by April2, Jan 24, 2010
I know quite a few of you on here stated you were Christians and I just wanted to say don't think like I did and think just because you raised your kids that way and go to church, etc., that your kids won't be tempted or succumb to sex. I was surprised not only that it happened to my daughter but to find out how many "good kids" in her youth group were having sex. I never would have thought it! I've had to rethink things too and wondered if I shouldn't have just put my daughter on the pill. I thought that would be sending the wrong message, that I was ok with her having sex. When you've talked to your kids and they've heard the message and assure you they want to wait till marriage, what do you do at that point? There's so much temptation out there that bombard our teens at a difficult time in their lives when their hormones are raging to begin with. Even when they know about sex, std's, etc., sometimes they still do what they want to do partly because I believe their brains are still a bit immature and they honestly think things won't happen to them. They say their brains don't fully develop till they're in their 20's. Some kids are more mature than others, of course. I'm not sure there's any perfect solution here.

I taught my kids about sex, etc. I also warned both about alcohol and that alcoholism runs in our family yet I know my son drinks with his friends and I worry about that (He's 21). All I can do is hope he's being responsible. Sometimes kids just don't listen to you and have to learn things on their own, unfortunately.

730826 tn?1317943334
by Lucey12, Jan 24, 2010
April. Wow. All the super Christian kids who went to youth group and all that (who I knew) were waiting till marriage and HAVE. I would have thought the same as you. About the alcoholism, Im so surprised with my sister and myself really. We dont drink at all. We did around the age of 17ish but by 19 hit, neither of us were drinkers. Weird. My brother on the other hand had a big problem and realized it and stopped now hes slipped in to the thought that a few is ok, not hes quite the drinker. Alcoholism runs in my family (grandfather mostly) and my husbands family are huge drinkers and druggies. Out of his 11 aunts and uncles, all of them are drug addicts or alcoholics. My husband drank quite a bit when we met but over a few years only has one or two on occasion. Sometimes it helps seeing family members go through it for them to say no, sometimes (like myself) it takes being there and realizing your better sober.

Avatar universal
by vamoosh, Jan 19, 2012
wow i just read a few of those comments and i just want to say that sex ed still happens and all through high school i am 15 (going on 16 in feb) and starting year 11 and i sat through sex ed from the start of year five and even now! some of you have over exagerrated with how some teens react to the situation they know how you get pregnant and know that they should use conraception methods! also teen pregnancy is not accepted it is veryl frowned upon! i know you aren't judging or anything but most of the kids are scared and are not sure if the changes are normal for there body, you should be helping them not saying they aren't educated! i know you don't wanna hear this from a kid! but i am sick of parents,adults,teachers or whatever saying it isn't okay to have sex at an early age and that we can catch STI's, and say oh but hey go have sex but use condoms goon the pill but know those things might not work! you confuse them so thats why kids worry if they are or aren't pregnant! plus kids like to rebel, but using reverse psycology isn't gonna work it makes it worse! so you know i am just saying that we "kids" do not plan to do things we are not stupid we are not irrasponsible and no you have no idea what we go through cause everyone is diferent and times and things change!!

1809109 tn?1331803777
by ducky406, Jan 20, 2012
The problem isn't that sex education isn't happening is that it's not happening consistently. Every school district in the states has a different view on how to teach it. Some opt for abstinence only; some for the don't have sex, here's condoms; and some that actually answer questions. On top of that your parent can say they don't want you to go to sex education. So even if you put your kid through sex ed in school, if assume they will teach them everything they need to know and you could be making a BIG mistake. Teachers get caught up on time- there is only so many questions you can answer while people are giggling. Also there are things that the teachers aren't allowed to say based on the school. (For instance I would assume a teacher at a catholic school wouldn't be able to talk about abortion.)  

Personally when my first sex education came up I had already learned the anatomy of a penis, vagina, and human embryology from my mom's old medical text books. (My mom first caught my brother and I giggling at them when we were about 5/6 so she explained the differences between the sexes and put them on a higher shelf.) About the time when you're supposed to learn about what happens to your body during puberty, my sister was also was 4 months pregnant (at 15 years old). So I just told my mom I didn't want to go, because I didn't think I needed it. She drilled me on std's, condoms, birth control, and female problems (how to give yourself a breast exam, yeast infection/bacterial infections), etc. She was satisfied with my answers and I never went through sex ed of any kind until I took an anatomy class in college. I really didn't miss much. Like any teen I had a couple oops. My mom wanted to smack me when she found out I didn't ask for b/c before becoming sexually active. And I did have to take the plan b after... a less than rational and far from thoughtful moment. But all in all, I think I had a really good education.

In my opinion sex education needs to be monitored at home, don't ever leave it up to the schools. If you don't feel comfortable to talk about it, let the schools teach but really a parent needs to know what they aren't teaching.

And when it comes down to it, my sister wanted to get pregnant at 15. My mother could have been more strict with her, but she was a wild child set in her own way of thinking and chased down what she wanted. So even if the education is there, sometimes that's not enough.

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