886824?1253736654
Jordanna Joaquina, MS, CGC  
Female

Interests: Prenatal Genetics, Pediatric Genetics
199
AccessDNA
Los Angeles, CA
All Journal Entries Journals

Ankylosing Spondylitis and HLA-B27

May 21, 2009 - 3 comments
Tags:

Ankylosing Spondylitis

,

genetics of ankylosing spondyl

,

symptoms of ankylosing spondyl

,

hla-b27

,

HLA-B gene



Ankylosing spondylitis is an autoimmune condition that causes chronic inflammatory arthritis primarily affecting the spine.

Ankylosing spondylitis is most likely a multifactorial condition, which means that it involves a combination of genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors. It is currently well established that ankylosing spondylitis also runs in some families. Researchers believe that there are probably a number of genes that affect the development and symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis.

For example, the association between HLA-B27 (a variant of the HLA-B gene) and ankylosing spondylitis is one of the strongest known relationships between a MHC (major histocompatibility complex) antigen and a common disease.

For more information about the genetics of ankylosing spondylitis, visit: http://AccessDNA.com/condition/Ankylosing_Spondylitis/41

Comments
Post a Comment
168348 tn?1379357075
by ChitChatNine, May 21, 2009
Hi,

Two of my daughters (my other two children are arthritis-free) were tested negative for the HLA-B27 gene, but thought to have spondyloarthritis in a mild form that went into full remission for both of them.  After two yeras of treatment with NSAID's, our Ped Rhuemy at the time, suggested there was a 33% chance of full remission for them and, indeed, it seems to have held solid.  This was aprox. 6 yrs ago and today they are 16 & 18.  We were told that because the gene was not present, even if they came out of remission, it wouldn't be too severe (most likely) because of the absence of the gene.

My oldest started with a reactive arthritis after a bad viral illness with 104 temp and bronchitis + asthma and my other daughter's was triggered by documented post streptoccocal reactive arthritis thru Anti-DNase-B antibodies with #'s extremely high .. if I recall ... 432.   After 8 yrs, she had a recurrence just last month which our prudent Ped blood tested her ASO titre and it was 800+ and that was after the 2nd round of antibiotics for an ear infection and facial rash that wasn't responding .. she immediately recognized it as strep (even with a negative throat culture done overnight) and ordered many tests inc. the ASO, Lyme, etc.   Her joints are fine again within 2 weeks on the 3rd antibiotic, so no recurrence thankfully and she's fine and ASO will be reteted in July.

Interesting to note, too, that both have had cases of RSD which needed phys. therapy and that is in full remission too.  The Ped Rheumy and / or Orthopedist thought they had broken a finger/bone at first and took x-rays and then put it all together.  RSD was awful.  My oldest has also had two bouts of severe DeQuervain's Syndrome in her wrist and had to be casted, but that is fully resolved also.

Interesting to note that both have severe allergies .. bee sting for my 16yr old and my oldest daughter is anaphylactic to latex, plums and nuts and both have asthma.

Thanks for such a wonderful journal you've written ---!!!

C~
Co-CL Thyroid Disorders





Avatar universal
by Jsalexa, Dec 27, 2009
Doctors are not sure of the cause for AS, but they do know that genetics plays a part in the disease. Around 95% of patients diagnosed with this disease have a gene which produces a genetic marker, HLA-B27. However, having this gene does not mean a person is sure to get the disease. There is only about a 40% chance of developing AS if you have this gene. Also, you do not have to have this gene in order to develop AS. Many people have the HLA-B27 producing gene, around or below 25% of the population depending on the country, but only between 1% and 5% of people actually develop ankylosing spondylitis.

Resource:
http://www.ankylosingspondylitiscenter.com/

Avatar universal
by Jsalexa, Dec 27, 2009
Doctors are not sure of the cause for AS, but they do know that genetics plays a part in the disease. Around 95% of patients diagnosed with this disease have a gene which produces a genetic marker, HLA-B27. However, having this gene does not mean a person is sure to get the disease. There is only about a 40% chance of developing AS if you have this gene. Also, you do not have to have this gene in order to develop AS. Many people have the HLA-B27 producing gene, around or below 25% of the population depending on the country, but only between 1% and 5% of people actually develop ankylosing spondylitis.

Resource:
Ankylosing Spondylitis

Post a Comment