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A New Lead for Autoimmune Disease

A drug derived from the hydrangea root, used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine, shows promise in treating autoimmune disorders, report researchers from the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Immune Disease Institute at Children’s Hospital Boston (PCMM/IDI), along with the Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

For the entire article, visit: http://www.newswise.com/p/articles/view/552951/
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I can see how this study might give hope to those who have an acquired autoimmunity or D1.  However, it does not give a qualifying supposition for those born with an autoimmunity.  I wish it did, because my daughter is deficient.  She must be test every 6 mo, or if between, when she catches a common cold for her immunity levels.  She has endured many gammaglobulin therapies, and also has a central line port in case her levels become too low.  Her last treatment was 2 yrs ago.

Although I have put her on an herbal and natural vitamen regimen, and so far since, she has been fine.. I still worry when the next episode is going to occur.

This article does not touch on those of use who are born with multi-immune disorders...only acquired.  :(
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Any reason to not just find a way to use the root instead of making a drug?  Not strong enough?  Toxic?  Any evidence the herb itself is helpful in a Chinese formula?
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Avatar universal
Another study links autism to vaccines
Yet another study has linked mercury-laden vaccines to autism.

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh and Thoughtful House Center for Children in Austin, Texas gave infant monkeys a series of vaccines following the typical schedule given to American kids in the 1990s.
Then, they compared the brains of these monkeys to the brains of monkeys that were not vaccinated.
The vaccinated monkeys showed the brain changes associated with autism... while the unvaccinated monkeys did not.
The monkeys that received the vaccines had an increase in brain volume. Increased brain volume has strong links to autism. And after being given the 12-month vaccinations, the monkeys showed changes in the amygdala another region with strong ties to autism.
Dr. Andrew Wakefield, whose 1998 study in The Lancet linking vaccines to autism was retracted earlier this year.
They even stripped him of his medical license.
Dr. Wakefield never even said that the vaccines cause autism, and never suggested ending vaccinations.
He's in hot water for merely suggesting the link and asking the questions -- and saying that vaccines should be given one dose at a time, instead of in combo jabs.



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Avatar universal
I suffer with with Asperger's it came on after reaction to baby immunizations. My son contracted poliomyelitis from his first Sabin (OPV). Since that fiasco, my children have only herd immunity.
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