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Avatar universal

monovision iols,

I have the beginning of cataracts , am thinking of getting monovision iols inserted.  I cant afford retror are they still a good prospect.  I want to be able to work my computer and drive.  and play tennis.
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Avatar universal
Standards for who is appropriate for retinal surgery have changed significantly over the past decade, with improved surgical instruments and techniques.  Delaying surgery can result in irreversible damage to the macula.  Please get another opinion from an experienced retinal surgeon.
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
If I had gotten results like yours I would have done exactly the same thing.  Surgeons are very reluctant to explant.  You were very lucky that the second lens was not implanted because most doctors stress that both the ReSTOR lenses should be implanted before a patient can make a decision.  How's up close vision.  Just curious.

Ron
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
My experience with the ReSTOR lenses has been great. To add some balance to the debate of multifocal vs monofocal I would advise that you look into the archive here because it may provide you with some valuable information. I'm about a month and a half post-op on both eyes and have 20/20 at both distance and close up.  For me they have definately been a good choice. I got the impression from my surgeon that older patients are getting the monofocal and patients on the younger side are being advised to have the multifocal.  He said, "For you, at your age and circumsttances I would recommend the ReSTOR lens."  I felt that age was definately a factor in his recommendation. I also don't have astigmatism or needed too great of correction.  Good luck with your choice.
Ron
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I'm curious as to how your night driving vision is .That was one of  the worst issue for me.  I could not drive at night because of sunburst glare from the oncoming cars and all other light sources.  I am very happy that you had such good results with the Restor.  It is good to hear something  positive about them.

I also think you are right about the age factor.  The older people do seem to get the monofocal and I think it may be because of the expense of the multifocal. Or
it could be because there are other factors with "older" eyes. The bottom line is that we all want good, trouble-free, vision for ourselves and for others.  We want to help each other.

I am very happy to have found this forum and to be able to share experiences with others like yourself.  


Disappointed66 No More
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Avatar universal
I see slight rings around headlights that are pointed directly at me.  Headlights on the passenger side of an oncoming car that is not pointed directly at me has no rings. The rings look like fish eyes and extend out about the size of a large dinner plate.  Prior to surgery I had very large starbursts around lights at night.  I was told that this is normal with PSC.  When asked about the rings my surgeon said that the brain will learn to ignore this in about a year.  It was very difficult to drive at night prior to surgery because I couldn't tell where the exact location of the light source was. I can also see the rings on oncoming cars in daylight, but seeing the rings at either times is not really that much of an inonvenience because everything else is so crystal clear.  Did you experience anything like this?
Ron
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi Ron

Did I !   I could not drive at night!   The light glare as mentioned in my other post made it impossible. The glare did look like fish eyes, but what I was seeing was like ten feet in diameter.  Not only that, but I could see nothing else. Everything was a complete blur day or night. I did see rings around the lights during the day. I was only able to function and drive because I kept the glass lens in my glasses for the right eye. I could not take a chance that it would clear up, and I certainly was not going to have the other eye done, so I had it explanted. Both eyes are  done.  My low light and night driving now is excellent.  I have no light glare.  I know I made the right decision.  Restor was not for me.  I think if  anyone is not sure they should go ahead with the monofocals.  The worst thing  would be that you would have to wear glasses for some things and after you have been through what I have, that is not bad at all!

Take care.


Disappointed66 no more
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I would run away from the Restor lens.  I had one implanted in my left eye in July.  It was a nightmare as it has been for many others. I changed surgeons and had the Restor explanted for a Tecnis Aspheric monofocal lens for distance.  I had the same lens put in my right eye last Monday,  The results for me are terrific.  I can see  great for distance, my intermediate is quite good. I can watch T.V.  I can use the computer. All without glasses .I can drive without glasses day or night. My night vision without light glare is excellent. I only need reader glasses for small print.

Do some research on this forum.  Everyone's eyes are different,. you will find some very useful and expert information.  Check the archives on monofocal/multifocal. The multifocal lenses are expensive and are not worth the money.  Stick with the monofocals.  Talk to your opthomalogist and discuss with him/her what she thinks what would be the best monofocal for you. Get more than one opinion if necessary.Good luck.


Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi again,  

My doctor  (new surgeon) saw that I  literally, was going to have a nervous breakdown.He and his staff were wonderful and actually squeezed me in for surgery.  His practice had a 2 month wait. And under no circumstances was I going to have the other eye done.

I can  see up close/intermediate well.  I need readers for small print.  I can shop  without glasses unless I need to read the fine print on labels.  All in all I am happy. The best part is waking up and not having to put on glasses and be able to see the clock!
First surgeon did not inform me about anything or the choices I had. I had no idea what was involved in cataract surgery/ And that is so unlike me..  I don't know how I found this forum, but I can say thank  God I did.  That is why I'm stressing the fact to do research, Get more then one opinion, especially if the doctor tells you very little.  You have to be informed before making a decision.  That was my advice to bron191

That's it for now.  Take care

d66nm
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi.    What you describe in Nov. 16  5:53 pm post is exactly what I am looking for.  To have a broad   "range of vision"  which includes  distance, intermediate (television) and close (computer).  I assume you need glasses to read?  So you have everything coming in clearly.  How wonderful!
Crystalens promises the same, but at a high price, probably because it also adds that you might get reading ability as well. ( I wonder how many Crystalens consumers actually achieved this).Because of complications - retina problems after surgery - I still can't read, see t.v., or drive (all is a blur).  Can only see my fingertips clearly, even with contact lens correction.  Surgeon says that he can only correct with Lasik what I see now with contact lens.  That glasses over that will do nothing.  He doesn't even recommend retina surgery saying my eye is not bad enough!  I am happy to hear about your great results, and can only imagine the courage it must have taken to achieve them.


  
Helpful - 0
517208 tn?1211640866
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Dear bron191,

I recommend that you speak with your eyeMD about your best options given activities and what you can afford.  Monofocal IOL’s will still enable improved vision after cataract removal; however, you will not have both distance and reading.  For playing tennis, and driving these are distance activities, and monovision will reduce some distance correction and depth perception; however, computer vision should be possible.  Glasses would enable the best vision for those activities which bother you with monovision.

Dr. Feldman

Sandy T. Feldman, M.D., M.S.
ClearView Eye and Laser Medical Center
San Diego, California
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
ThanksJodie for your reply about standards for getting retinal surgery.  My cataract surgeon said vision had to be 20/70 or worse to warrant the risks, and that a vitrectomy could make my vision worse  - and it is horrible now.
I have (2nd) retinal surgeon who said that removing the pucker could possibly improve many of my symptoms - he could not predict the exact results (wise).  Then he stressed that it is elective - - he told me the risks involved and assured me that  that if a hole/tear developed in the macula during surgery he could put a bubble (?) in place.  He was very kind and caring. Expressed his opinions confidently.  Good listener.  With the  NY Eye and Ear Infirmary.  We are currently trying my first steroid shot – mainly because I became fearful when the cataract surgeon said a vitrectomy could make my vision worse.  Not sure of the steroid shot results yet.  Had it 2 weeks ago.  Lots of floaters still need to dissipate.  Bless you for your interest.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
The belief that vision needs to be 20/70 or worse to have ERM surgery might have been valid a dozen years ago, but it is certainly NOT valid today.  The biggest risk is cataract development--not a problem for you.  The literature reports that the risk of retinal detachment is about 1%.  Please be sure that your retinal specialist has performed ERM surgery MANY times.  You'd want a doctor who uses the new sutureless instruments.  Peeling the ILM is associated with reduced distortion--but make sure that no dyes are used.  (They are toxic to the retina!)  
Helpful - 0

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