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Hoping someone can look at my MRI results and tell me what they are??

Hi! I have been having allot of pain deep in my left buttock and leg for the last 6 months. I think it is my sciatic nerve? Not sure if it is from something on my spine or my piriformis muscle pushing on my sciatic nerve? Went to the doctor and he also asked if I have tingling in my right arm, which I do, so he ordered Cervical Spine and Lower Lumbar MRIs. Please if anyone has time if they could read my results. I am a 50 yo male in excellent shape, workout every day very hard, lifting weight. Have about 12% body fat and fairly muscular.

Cervical Spine:
Findings:
Severe multilevel cervical spondylosis with reversal of the cervical
lordosis centered around C4-5.

C2-3: Unremarkable.

C3-4: Severe osteophytic stenosis of the left neural foramen. Moderate
osteophytic stenosis of the right neural foramen. Patent central canal.
Preserved disc space.

C4-5: Grade 4 disc degeneration. Moderate sized disc osteophyte complex.
Mild to moderate central canal stenosis. Severe osteophytic stenosis of
the neural foramina bilaterally.

C5-6: Grade 4-5 disc degeneration. Moderate sized disc osteophyte complex.
Moderate central canal stenosis. Severe osteophytic stenosis of the right
neural foramen. Moderate to severe osteophytic stenosis of the left neural
foramen.

C6-7: Grade 4 disc degeneration. Moderate sized concentric disc osteophyte
complex. Mild to moderate central canal stenosis and bilateral osteophytic
stenosis of the neural foramina, severe on the right, moderate on the
left.

Reactive bone marrow signal changes likely degenerative. Preserved
vertebral height and alignment. Visualized portion of the upper thoracic
spine is within normal limits. Normal cord size and signal.

Impression:
advanced compressive cervical spondylosis. Consider clinical and
laboratory correlation with inflammatory markers to rule out low-grade
infection. Given the lack of bone marrow specific sequences, short-term
follow-up MRI is suggested for the above described bone marrow signal
abnormality.

Lower Lumbar:
Findings:
Transitional lumbar sacral junctional segment. The lowermost well
developed lumbar type segment will be labeled L5-S1.

L5-S1: Grade 4 disc degeneration with moderate disc height reduction.
Severe bilateral facet arthropathy. Grade 1 degenerative anterolisthesis.
Moderate thickening of the ligamenta flava. Mild to moderate central canal
stenosis. Mild stenosis of the lateral recesses. Severe bilateral stenosis
of the neural foramina right greater than left.

L4-5: Grade 5 disc degeneration with minimal symmetric disc bulge. Modic 2
endplate spondylosis. Patent central canal, lateral recesses and neural
foramina.

L3-4: Grade 4 disc degeneration with moderate disc height reduction.
Otherwise unremarkable.

The remaining lumbar segments are unremarkable.

Incidentals: Bilateral T2 bright renal parenchymal space occupying lesions
incompletely characterized, likely representing cysts on a statistical
basis.

Impression:
Multilevel lumbar spondylosis. Attention should be given to the counting
ambiguity should surgery be contemplated.
2 Responses
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20886884 tn?1568224960
You sound alot like my problem.. im gonna watch and hope you get some respones cause maybe it'll help me figure out with me to.. Good Luck with everything.. hope you get to feelin better
Helpful - 0
973741 tn?1342342773
Hello.  Have you seen your doctor since you wrote this?  I'd love to know what their treatment plan for you was.  I also told Sheryxoxo there are key words you can look at. Cervical spondylosis is different than what you have Sherryxoxo.  This is wear and tear of spinal discs and neck.  Usually it is because of arthritis (like your issue Sherry) but believe it or not, it often has no symptoms and when it does, medication works pretty well to treat it.  Here is some info https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cervical-spondylosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20370787  

However, krcab, you have some other things going on.  Your spondyliosis in some areas is advanced so that is likely causing pain.  And you have disc degeneration.  Now, that hurts. That is like the shock absorbers of your spine breaking down.  https://www.webmd.com/back-pain/degenerative-disk-disease-overview#1  Medication, physical therapy, proper weight management may help.  Surgery is sometimes recommended.

Let us know what happened and what route you took to feel better.  
Helpful - 0
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