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Paraprotein, tumor marker and elevated IgG subclass 2

I had had MS for 20 year and had multiple treatments of immunosuppressant drugs.
Recently I have been feeling extremely fatigued and generally unwell.
Blood results show I have a lambda paraprotein, I also have an elevated CA19-9 tumor marker of 179, and I have an elevated IgG subclass 2, at 686 mg/dL.
Would like some direction as this could be?
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15695260 tn?1549593113
Hello and welcome to the forum. We're sorry you have to ask this question as I'm sure you are worried. Is there any update? Your doctors should go over things with you. An elevated CA19-9 is used as a tumor marker for pancreatic cancer. Yours is out of range which normal is between 0 and 37. The CA 19-9 marker is associated with cancers in the colon, stomach, and bile duct. Elevated levels of CA 19-9 may indicate advanced cancer in the pancreas, but it is also associated with noncancerous conditions, including gallstones, pancreatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, and cholecystitis.  So, there indeed can be benign reasons for that elevation but obviously you need to investigate this with your doctor.

The other elevation you mention of the IgG subclass 2 is a big concerning as well.

Have you spoken to your doctor and where are things at with this currently and we'll go from there.
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