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Depression and Low Testosterone

I have been feeling terrible for about 2 months. Severe anxiety, depression, etc. it's hard to get out of bed and I'm walking around in a fog. I'm totally disconnected from the world.  I just want to sleep, be left alone and try to go to work to support my family.  Got my blood results back from my GP and I have low testosterone (level of an 85 year old) and I'm 40, low Vitamin D and elevated Thyroid antibodies. My GP prescribed me Ambien to sleep and Lexapro.  The Ambien has been great but I am refusing to take the Lexapro until I have everything else ruled out.  I've been reading a lot about the connection between low testosterone, thyroid problems and depression.  I have an appointment with my Internist next week followed by a Thyroid specialist the next week.  Am I right to wait on the Lexapro? My brother in law takes it with great results but I just think it was a quick diagnosis.  Would love to hear your thoughts. I feel awful.  There hasn't been a day in the last three weeks I haven't cried in frustration.
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Avatar universal
You're right.  The Lexapro won't solve any of your problems if it's a physiological problem.  Follow your instincts and see if there's a hormonal or other cause first.  Docs, especially general docs, are very quick to give you a drug that suppresses symptoms rather than treating the problem.  And if you ever do decide to go on an antidepressant, I'd advise doing it with a psychiatrist, not a general doc -- they know the downsides of these drugs better usually. As for the Ambien, be careful with that, too -- if you take it on a regular basis you will end up with worse insomnia.  Once in awhile is okay, but it sounds odd -- from what you say you're sleeping fine -- too fine.  So why a sleeping aid when you're problem as you state it is that you don't want to be awake?  So here's the thing -- any one of the problems you mention, low testosterone, thyroid problems, or lack of Vitamin D can cause all your symptoms.  None of them is treated with an antidepressant.
3 Comments
Thank you for the support. I am so sad and depressed right now.  I can barely get out of bed. My poor wife is at the end of her rope with me.  She is supportive but doesn't understand the pain.
You need to get to a responsible doctor and an endocrinologist to get a good diagnosis.  Vitamin D3 is easy to get in gel cap.  Thyroid is more complicated to treat -- if your thyroid is still working, there are things you can learn about that won't kill off your thyroid.  If you have to go on medication, it will probably kill off your thyroid and you'll have to take the medication the rest of your life.  But if you have to you have to.  Low testosterone might have been just on that minute of that day, as levels change throughout the day -- highest in the morning, for example.  There are things you can do about that, too.  Staying in bed for this won't fix it.  
Thank you for the support. I got up today and went to work. I really appreciate your time.  These forums are really great since it takes three weeks to get into any specialist.  I took the Testosterone test first thing in the a.m. More than likely I'll need to address that.  As for my thyroid, I started on a strict AIP diet to try and reverse the antibodies.  The depression symptoms are so hard.  I never had respect for depression until now.  The pain is worse than I could imagine.  
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