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Worried about infection and symptoms

I previously posted and didn't get an answer. After my encounter approximately 3 to 4 weeks ago i've become nervous have contracted this HIV. My body has felt fatigued, even after good sleeps, I've had canker sore after canker sore . I didn't think anything of the encounter originally so I still had intercourse with my girlfriend afterwards, afterwords meaning very recently not after the act. She has recently developed a bug bite looking spot on her hand and I am  worrying that she has the rash and I am freaking out.  Could it be HIV that I gave to her assuming I have it? Please provide some insight as I am extremely stressed and anxious about this whole thing. This is the last time I ever consider infidelity.
3 Responses
Avatar universal
If you had unprotected vaginal/anal penetration ((the minor penetration you described before)) you should get tested. The risk is low, however, you should refrain form unprotected intercourse until you get a conclusive result at 3 months post exposure.
Avatar universal
It was practically just the head that entered (if that) due to her rubbing my half flaccid penis on her vagina, I don't recall being fully inside as I was not hard enough. Can you elaborate on the symptoms I described at all. It would give me peace of mind if you dove into that

Thank you for your response though. How do you go about getting tested? Are their relatively easy ways?
Avatar universal
If you penetrated ((full penetration or not)), you need to get tested. Take a DUO at 28 days post exposure ((no later)) as a good indication. Follow up at 3 months post exposure with another antibody test for a conclusive result.
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